You tube we bare bears

Q&A: ‘We Bare Bears’ creator Daniel Chong on how the show keeps pushing its storytelling

Wherever Grizzly, Panda and Ice Bear are, there’s definitely some fun to be found.

Created by Daniel Chong, “We Bare Bears” is an animated show following the antics of tech-savvy brothers Grizz, Panda and Ice Bear (a polar bear) as they try to navigate love, friendships and integrating into human society.

Loosely based on Chong’s original web comic featuring the stackable bear siblings, the family-friendly comedy recently kicked off its fourth season on Cartoon Network.

“Now that we’re in our fourth season, the show is really a combination of me and the artists that I work with,” Chong recently told The Times. “They add so much of themselves into [the show] and they push the concept further.

“I really think that’s how you’re able to get over 100 episodes of something. You have to let other people take the reins and push it to places you probably didn’t think of,” he added.

In July, “We Bare Bears” picked up its first Emmy nomination for short form animated program. The show also won an Annie Award earlier this year in the animated television/broadcast production for children category.

For the first set of “goofy” Season 4 episodes, Chong said the crew wanted to emphasize the baby versions of the brothers a little bit more.

“There’s a couple of really cool Baby Bear adventures in addition to just a lot of Bear-centric stories showing the Bears just getting into more antics and trouble,” said Chong.

He recently discussed the fourth season of his hit series, its guest stars and that Emmy nomination.

How did the celebrity cameos for these new episodes come together?

T-Pain posted on his Instagram over a year ago almost that he tattooed Panda on his hand. It kind of blew us all away, so I messaged him on Twitter and was like, “Yo, man, do you want to be on an episode of ‘Bears’?” And he was like, “Yo, man, I’m watching it right now.”

He was totally down to do it, and we basically wrote an episode around him. He was so much fun to record.

As for Leslie Odom Jr., we have a musical episode we did. This is our second one, and it’s kind of like you’re watching YouTube and you just click on different videos and the Bears are singing.

One of the artists, Louie Zong, had just seen “Hamilton,” so he made a “Hamilton”-like rap for the Bears. And we just thought it would be really cool to get someone from “Hamilton,” so we reached out to Leslie and he was totally game.

What made you decide bears were the best way to explore family, community and the human condition?

The nice thing about animations is that you can use anthropomorphic characters. Animals or objects can come alive and they can be a way for people to put themselves into a story regardless of race or something else specific.

We’re using that to our advantage and using the bears as placeholders that everyone can identify with. Even if your story isn’t quite like theirs, where they’re outsiders trying to fit in with humans, you understand that they also have other things that they deal with in trying to navigate the world.

Ice Bear, left, Grizz and Panda in “We Bare Bears.”

(Cartoon Network)

Asian pop culture is seamlessly integrated into this world. What made you decide to include that element?

I think that’s intrinsic to my taste and the things that I grew up with and the things that aesthetically I really liked.

Cute culture is a thing that’s permeating a lot these days, but I think it has influenced a lot of the way I draw, the things I find appealing and things like that.

It’s also my crew. A lot of them grew up on anime and they love Asian food. Even the people who aren’t Asian on my crew, they keep going back to Japan or love eating Korean food and things like that.

Everyone had a lot of appreciation for Asian culture, whether they’re Asian or not, and it kind of just found its way into the show.

What was your favorite part of the Emmy-nominated episode “Hurricane Hal”?

I would say the third act, when all the stories came together. It was very unexpected. A lot of that I attribute to the two story artists Louie Zong and Sang Lee.

The nice thing about our process is that we’re story driven. We work hard on the outline, which is just three pages laying out without too much minute detail what the broad strokes of the story are. Then the board artists, as they’re drawing it, improvise as they go and they find different ways to stylize the story.

That third act came together so powerfully.

I kind of knew when, I think Louie Zong was the one who pitched that version, I could tell that it had this weight to it I just didn’t expect the story to have. Those guys just really knocked it out of the park. That to me is my favorite part for sure.

“Hurricane Hal” just had this bigger statement about storytelling and there was a lot of ambition to it. I just felt like it was something that should represent us this year.

Grizz, left, Chloe, Ice Bear and Panda in “We Bare Bears.”

(Cartoon Network)

How do you and your writers still keep things fresh four seasons into the show?

It’s hard. Definitely as we got further into the season we started running into that problem.

We have all the episodes on a wall, so there’s always a reminder of what we’ve done before. There were so many times we were writing and said, “Oh, no, we already did it in that episode” and we had to rethink the way to tell the story. It can get a little frustrating.

It just takes more work and time to break a story these days. But the writers constantly are surprising me, and the story artists have become very involved too, in helping to pitch ideas. We all work together to try to push the storytelling as much as we can.

The nice thing is that after getting to this point, the show, even though it’s episodic, we still have some continuity that we’re playing with here and there.

Those areas that are kind of being pushed a little more and relationships that are slightly different now can create new ways or directions for stories that I wouldn’t have imagined in Season 1.

In a way the storytelling after 100 episodes kind of takes you to different places. So in some ways it hasn’t been as difficult. It’s a little of both.

Did you expect the Baby Bears to take off the way they did, with a whole life and story line of their own?

I always thought, and I think even the writers that I had at the time also thought, it would only be maybe one or two episodes per season that we would do the Baby Bears. The main focus would definitely be the adult bears.

Then the audience liked it, but we also started to really love their adventures too.

The nice thing about the Baby Bears is that they can kind of be anywhere. You can almost push their adventures a little bit more outlandish because they’re babies and we can put them in more ridiculous situations. For some reason, it feels a little bit more doable than with the adult bears.

And I love working with those kids. They’re so funny, listening to them record.

The Baby Bear versions of Grizz, left, Panda and Ice Bear in “We Bare Bears.”

(Cartoon Network)

[email protected]

Twitter: @tracycbrown

Sours: https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/herocomplex/la-et-hc-daniel-chong-we-bare-bears-20180813-story.html
This article is about the website. You may be looking for the episode.

Everyone's Tube


Everyone's Tube is a video sharing website (similar to YouTube in real life) that makes its first appearance in the Pilot, but canonically makes its first appearance in the episode "Viral Video". The Bears use it to watch videos and attempt to make viral videos of their own.

The website made other notable appearances in the episodes "Primal" and "Nom Nom".

Videos

The following videos listed are all shown within the show.

  • Andy Bangs is at it again!! SO FUNNY! — Andy Bangs
  •  !!! CUTEST video ever LOLZ — Grizzly
  • Breakfast!! Yelling Panda — Grizzly
  • COOLEST BEAR VIDEO EVER!!! — Grizzly
  • HUGE BLOWUP — Marie
  • Koala eats leaves WOW — Nom Nom
  • NEW NOM NOM! NOT SCARY! — Nom Nom
  • NOM NOM eats LEMON!!! HILARIOUS!!! — Nom Nom
  • NOM NOM FALLS AGAIN! — Nom Nom
  • NOM NOM GETS A SWEET SURPRISE! — Nom Nom
  • Baby sloths on the march — Unknown
  • Hedgehog playing piano!!! CUTE!! XD — Unknown
  • PUMP UP MIXXX!! — Unknown
  • Epic Panda Prank - Bear_vids
  • TIDDLES GETS A SWEET SURPRISE!!! — Unknown
  • GRIZZ IMPRESSION!! - Bear_vid$
  • Chloe and the Bears - Bear_vid$
  • SCARED BY CUCUMBERS!! - Bear_vid$
  • BEAR FACTS OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO - Bear_vid$
  • Pinecone Man Tutorial - Unknown
  • ACAPELLA BEARS - Unknown

Trivia

  • Its name and logo are a parody of YouTube.
    • Everyone's Tube also shares many of YouTube's functions, having a similar search bar, player, the ability to like or dislike a video, the ability to comment, the Related Videos section, etc.
    • Though Everyone's Tube is a parody of YouTube, it appears to resemble YouTube during 2010, rather than its current version.
  • In Pan Man's other song "Mind was Blown", the Yamaha DX7 internal factory patch "Electric Piano 1" was heard.
Sours: https://webarebears.fandom.com/wiki/Everyone%27s_Tube
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We Bare Bears

We Bare Bears is an American animated television series created by Daniel Chong for Cartoon Network. The show follows three bears, Grizzly, Panda, and Ice Bear (respectively voiced by Eric Edelstein, Bobby Moynihan, and Demetri Martin), and their awkward attempts at integrating with the human world in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The series was based on Chong's webcomicThe Three Bare Bears, and the pilot episode made its world premiere at the KLIK! Amsterdam Animation Festival, where it won in the "Young Amsterdam Audience" category. The show premiered on July 27, 2015 and ended on May 27, 2019 and ran for four seasons and 140 episodes.[2]

A film adaptation, We Bare Bears: The Movie was released digitally on June 30, 2020[3] and later aired on Cartoon Network on September 7, 2020; it served as a conclusion to the narrative of the series.[2] A TV spin-off, entitled We Baby Bears and focusing on the three bears when they were cubs, was announced in May 2019 to be in development and will release in 2022.[4]

Plot[edit]

See also: List of We Bare Bears characters

We Bare Bears follows three adoptive brother bears: Grizzly (often called Grizz), Panda (often called Pan-Pan), and Ice Bear. The bears attempt to integrate with human society, such as by purchasing food, making human companions or trying to become famous on the Internet, although these attempts see the bears struggle to do so due to the civilized nature of humans and their own animal instincts.[5] However, in the end, they figure out that they have each other for support.[6]

The Bears often form a "bear stack", which they use to get around the city, and has become perhaps the most recognizable image from the show.[5] Occasionally, the bears share adventures with their friends, such as child prodigy Chloe Park, bigfoot Charlie, internet sensation koala Nom Nom, park ranger Tabes, and produce saleswoman Lucy. Some flashback episodes chronicle the adventures of the bears as cubs trying to find a home.

Production[edit]

(From top to bottom) Grizzly, Panda and Ice Bear (pictured left) forming their "bear stack".[5]

The show was created by cartoonist Daniel Chong, who had previously worked as a story artist for Pixar and Illumination Entertainment. The show is based on his webcomicThe Three Bare Bears, which features the same characters.[7] This webcomic was uploaded online from 2010 to 2011,[8] running for ten strips. Chong has said he first drew the bears, including drawing them in a stack, in an attempt to make his girlfriend's niece laugh.[9] Chong also said that, after a different pilot he was working on did not get picked up, he wanted to pitch something else, "and this was just the closest thing near me!" Chong said that doing the comic helped a lot with the show, especially in providing the dynamic between the three main characters, though the characters have also evolved a lot from the comic.[10]

Billed as a comedy, the show is a production of Cartoon Network Studios, which developed the program with Chong as part of their shorts development program. It was announced during the network's 2014 upfront.[6] According to Chong, much of the pilot was done with traditional watercolors, then digitally altered, to give "a naturalistic feel", but traditional work was not possible for a full show so he and the art director found a digital way to produce a "painterly feel", using references such as Peanuts cartoons, children's book illustrators like Tomi Ungerer and E. H. Shepard, and The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.[10][11]

Nom Nom and Charlie were initially voiced by Ken Jeong and Tom Arnold, respectively, before getting recast sometime before airing. Episodes, other than specials and shorts, were 11 minutes long.

Broadcast[edit]

Main article: List of We Bare Bears episodes

See also: List of We Bare Bears episodes § Shorts

The pilot episode made its world premiere at the KLIK! Amsterdam Animation Festival at the EYE Film Institute Netherlands in 2014.[12] The short won the KLIK! Young Amsterdam Audience Award.[13]

We Bare Bears premiered on Cartoon Network in the US and Canada on July 27, 2015.[14] A total of 140 episodes, 15 shorts have been made, as well as a film.

Home media[edit]

RegionTitleSeason(s)EpisodesRunning time
(minutes)
Release date
1Viral Video112 ("Our Stuff" – "Panda's Date" • "Burrito" • "Jean Jacket" • "Shush Ninjas" – "Charlie" • "Occupy Bears" • "The Road")132October 4, 2016[15]
2Volume 1112 ("Our Stuff" – "My Clique")132October 7, 2019[16]
4The Complete First Season126286June 9, 2017[17]
Complete Seasons 1–31–3961,056February 14, 2019[18]

Reception[edit]

Critical[edit]

We Bare Bears has received generally positive reviews from critics. The pilot was described by the EYE Film Institute Netherlands as "hilarious and endearing",[19] and it won in the "Young Amsterdam Audience" category.[20] The show was praised by Mashable for tackling "modern millennial anxieties" and for representing racial minorities; Mashable called the show "a parable about the charms and perils of an increasingly connected society".[21]Common Sense Media described the show "a funny and heartwarming story" that "sometimes poke gentle fun at hallmarks of modern society". It said that "what stands out is how the characters' uniqueness serves them well as a group" and considered it suitable for ages 8 and up.[22]The Straits Times of Singapore noted that We Bare Bears has appealed to adults as well, and said that the series stands out "because it juxtaposes a somewhat mature sense of humour with a visual style that recalls the hand-drawn illustrations from children's books."[9]

According to Chong, fans responded positively to the human communities being ethnically diverse.[9] The Asian-American news site NextShark said that the show had gained popularity among Asian American communities because it "contains deeper messages of representation and belonging as a minority – something most Asian American children are far too familiar with." It noted that the show "unapologetically showcases and simultaneously normalizes Asian culture through their references to Panda’s love for K-pop and K-dramas, the Bears’ regular trips to their favorite boba shop, and Ice Bear's impressive ability to speak fluent Korean and cook traditional Korean dishes."[23]

A reviewer for TheA.V. Club was more mixed, saying in 2015 that the show "bounc[ed] between the extraordinary and the endearing," describing typical episodes as the bears "find[ing] themselves in some sort of bizarre yet generic conflict...with little background music, a more muted color palette, and a simpler vibe." Overall, The A.V. Club said it was "not a must-watch show by any means, but it’s charming and breezy enough to enjoy within its brief run-time."[7]

Den of Geek noted that the show embraced episodic storytelling, contrary to 90s and 2000s trends in kids' television, and felt that it "uses episodic storytelling to its full advantage and crafts adventures that are perfectly suited to the format." It noted that the show did have some light elements of serialization, including character growth.[24]Screen Rant said that the show was known for its 1990s pop culture references, such as depicting Charles Barkley magically appearing from a trading card.[25]

Ratings[edit]

See also: List of We Bare Bears episodes

The first episode of We Bare Bears had 2.05 million views on its first showing.[26] Ratings generally fell with time, with the final episode receiving 0.45 million viewers.[27] The first season topped US TV ratings for children aged 2 –11 in July 2015.[9]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Nominee Result Ref.
2016 Annie AwardsOutstanding Achievement, Storyboarding in an Animated TV/Broadcast Production Madeline Sharafian, Manny Hernandez, and Bert Youn (for "Burrito")Nominated
BAFTA Children's AwardsInternational We Bare BearsWon
2017 17th Kidscreen Awards Best Animated Series We Bare BearsWon
Best Writing We Bare BearsWon
24th International Trickfilm Festival Stuttgart Best International Animation Series For Kids We Bare BearsWon [28]
Kids' Choice Awards MexicoFavorite Cartoon We Bare BearsNominated [29]
2018 Annie AwardsBest Animated Television/Broadcast Production For Children "Episode: Panda's Art" Won
Annecy FestivalJury Award for a TV Series "Episode: Panda's Art" Won
Prix Jeunesse International Festival and Competition Best Fictional Show for 11- to 15-year-olds We Bare BearsNominated [30]
70th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy AwardsOutstanding Short Form Animated Program"Hurricane Hal" Nominated
2019 Annie AwardsOutstanding Achievement for Writing in an Animated Television / Broadcast Production "Hurricane Hal" Nominated

Book adaptations[edit]

Penguin Random House announced in 2014 that it would publish books based on various programs for Cartoon Network, including We Bare Bears. The books were produced out of the company's Cartoon Network Books imprint, a division of the Penguin Young Readers Group, and is based on a partnership with the network that started in 2013.[31] Books based on We Bare Bears are:

  • We Bare Bears: We Go Everywhere Handbook by Molly Reisner (2017)[32]
  • We Bare Bears Mad Libs by Hannah S. Campbell (2017)[33]
  • We Bare Bears Jumbo Coloring And Activity Book by Sofia Young (2020)[34]

Film adaptation[edit]

Main article: We Bare Bears: The Movie

On May 30, 2019, Cartoon Network announced that We Bare Bears: The Movie would be released in mid-2020.[4] On May 21, 2020, the film was announced to be released digitally on June 30, 2020 and on Cartoon Network on September 7, 2020; it served as a conclusion to the narrative of the series.[2] The movie was directed by Daniel Chong and features the same main voice actors as the TV show. The plot follows the three bear brothers Grizzly, Panda, and Ice Bear having to flee a wildlife control agent by leaving the Bay Area and seeking refuge to Canada. Along the way, the Bears endure hardships while staying true to their promise of being "bros for life".

Covering the film for SF Weekly, Grace Li summarized the film as "sweet and fun" and a perfect summation for four seasons of adventures. Though expressing regret over the series' unresolved story lines, she complimented its zany sense of humor and its ultimate message, which to her was that "you can always choose your family".[35] Shamus Kelley of Den of Geek gave the film a five out-of five star rating and praised it as an excellent film; one that feels relevant without losing the fun that made the show a fan favorite. Commending the relationship of its main characters, whose fight against intolerance he said infuses every moment of the film with more power and relevance than any other story the show has done before.[36] Rollin Bishop of ComicBook.com awarded the film a four out of five-star rating. Though describing it as poorly paced, he praised its decision to include the heavy themes, which were exacerbated by current events.[37]

Spin-off[edit]

A prequel series titled We Baby Bears was announced on May 30, 2019, which was slated to premiere on Cartoon Network in spring 2021 but has been delayed to January 2022.[38][39] The show will focus on the three bears when they were cubs. The series will be rendered in an anime-esque style and will feature the bears going on various adventures in their magic box. Manny Hernandez, who served as supervising director on the previous series, will serve as the showrunner while Daniel Chong will be involved as an executive producer.[40]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcYu, Brandon (2020-05-21). "Bay Area creator of 'We Bare Bears' marks end of series with new movie". Datebook. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  2. ^Milligan, Mercedes (2020-05-21). "Cartoon Network's 'We Bare Bears The Movie' Stacks Up for Digital Debut". Animation Magazine. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  3. ^ abHipes, Patrick (2019-05-30). "'We Bare Bears' Getting TV Movie Treatment, Potential Spinoff At Cartoon Network". Deadline. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  4. ^ abc"Annecy: Daniel Chong on Cartoon Network's Big New Play, 'We Bare Bears' (EXCLUSIVE)".
  5. ^ ab"Cartoon Network Unveils Upfront Slate For 2014–15". Deadline Hollywood. March 10, 2014. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  6. ^ abJohnson, Kevin (July 31, 2015). "We Bare Bears: "Everyday Bears"". TV Club. Retrieved December 4, 2020.
  7. ^Chong, Daniel. The Three Bare Bears (Online comic). Blogger. Archived from the original on June 4, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  8. ^ abcdde Souza, Alison de (2015-11-16). "Bears for adults and kids". The Straits Times. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  9. ^ abCarande, Adrian. "Interview with Daniel Chong, creator of We Bare Bears — Animac". www.animac.cat. Animac Magazine. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  10. ^"We Bare Bears – Interview with Daniel Chong, the Show Creator". Cartoon Network Australia. November 9, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2017 – via YouTube.
  11. ^"KLIK! Festival: Animated Shorts for Kids (9–12)". EYE Film Institute Netherlands. 2014. Archived from the original on August 6, 2017. Retrieved November 10, 2014 – via archive.today(subscription may be required or content may be available in libraries).
  12. ^"KLIK! - We Bare Bears". Eye. 2015-09-25. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  13. ^Cartoon Network Canada (July 27, 2015). "Don't miss the NEW series, WE BARE BEARS, premiering tonight at 7 pm et/pt!". Facebook.[self-published]
  14. ^"We Bare Bears DVD news: Box Art for Volume 1: Viral Video". TVShowsOnDVD.com. July 28, 2016. Archived from the original on September 1, 2016. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  15. ^"WE BARE BEARS". British Board of Film Classification. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  16. ^"We Bare Bears: Season 1". Madman Entertainment. June 9, 2017. Retrieved January 1, 2018.
  17. ^"We Bare Bears: Seasons 1–3". Madman Entertainment. February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  18. ^"KLIK! Festival: Cartoon Network: Next Generation". EYE Film Institute Netherlands. November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 10, 2014 – via archive.today(subscription may be required or content may be available in libraries).
  19. ^"We Bare Bears wint 'Young Amsterdam Audience Award 2014'" [We Bare Bears wins 'Young Amsterdam Audience Award 2014']. TV-Visie (in Dutch). Exsite. November 13, 2014. Archived from the original on December 4, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  20. ^Ng, Yi Shu. "'We Bare Bears' is a kids' show tackling modern millennial anxieties". Mashable. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  21. ^"We Bare Bears - TV Review". www.commonsensemedia.org. 2015-07-31. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  22. ^Hyun, Jin (2019-01-18). "From Boba to K-Pop: Why 'We Bare Bears' is So Relatable to Asians". NextShark. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  23. ^Kelley, Shamus (2017-08-25). "We Bare Bears Does Episodic Cartoons Right". Den of Geek. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  24. ^Armitage, Helen (2019-08-30). "We Bare Bears Season 3 Finale Explained". ScreenRant. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  25. ^Metcalf, Mitch (July 28, 2015). "Top 100 Monday Cable Originals (& Network Update): July 27, 2015". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on August 6, 2015. Retrieved August 15, 2015.
  26. ^"UPDATED: SHOWBUZZDAILY's Top 150 Monday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 5.27.2019 - Showbuzz Daily". www.showbuzzdaily.com. Archived from the original on May 29, 2019. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  27. ^"We Bare Bears Wins Best International Animation Series For Kids at 24th International Trickfilm Festival Stuttgart – RegularCapital". May 11, 2017. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  28. ^"We Bare Bears Nomination Finalist Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards Mexico 2017 – RegularCapital". August 6, 2017. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  29. ^"Finalists". prixjeunesse.de. Archived from the original on January 3, 2019. Retrieved February 14, 2018.
  30. ^Cartoon Network Partners with Penguin Young Readers Group on New Book Imprint. Children's Book Council. September 22, 2014. Archived from the original on December 22, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  31. ^Reisner, Molly (2017). We go every where handbook. New York, New York. ISBN . OCLC 954224166.
  32. ^Campbell, Hannah S. (2017). We bare bears mad libs. [Place of publication not identified]: Price Stern Sloan. ISBN . OCLC 951070681.
  33. ^Young, Sofia (18 August 2020). We Bare Bears Jumbo Coloring And Activity Book. ISBN .
  34. ^Li, Grace Z. (2020-07-03). "'We Bare Bears' Says Goodbye". SF Weekly. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  35. ^Kelley, Shamus (2020-06-30). "We Bare Bears The Movie Reminds Us Of The Series' True Message". Den of Geek. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  36. ^Bishop, Rollin (June 29, 2020). "We Bare Bears: The Movie Review: Home Sweet Bears". Movies. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  37. ^@Mannymator (May 30, 2021). "Sorry, the release is taking a bit longer than anticipated. But I 💯 % guarantee it'll be worth the wait!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  38. ^https://worldscreenevents.com/festivals/keynote-warnermedias-tom-ascheim/
  39. ^Mulligan, Mercedea (October 6, 2020). "Li'l Bros Return in Magical New CN Series 'We Baby Bears'". Animation Magazine. Retrieved October 6, 2020.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_Bare_Bears
This article is about the episode. You may be looking for the website.

Everyone's Tube

SeasonEpisodeOverall
21945

Storyboard by

Danny Ducker, Lauren Sassen, Louie Zong

Everyone's Tubeis the 19thepisode of the second seasonof We Bare Bearsand the 45th episode overall.

Synopsis

A anonymous user watches a variety of videos uploaded by The Bears in a compilation style, and viewers see videos the bears have uploaded.

Plot

We first see the home screen of a computer. An anonymous person pulls up the internet browser and begins to watch videos from Everyone's Tube. The first video we see is of Panda lip syncing to Just My Type while his brothers interrupt him. After the video is over, the unknown person scrolls through "more from this user" and clicks on the Swaggy Shuffle tutorial created by Grizzly. The mysterious user then opens the bears' channel, and clicks the featured video, which is of Ice Bear and Chloe singing and playing piano together. After this, we see a video of Grizzly being a DJ. The mysterious person goes to the search bar and searches "Good Music Video", then clicks on a video for the song Forever My Heart. Once the video finishes, autoplay starts a video of Grizzly dressed as a robot. The unknown user quickly presses the pause button and skips ahead to the next video, which is of Ice Bear dancing while going about his regular activities. The unknown person then subscribes to the bears' channel. When they are notified, they begin to sing and dance until Ice Bear accidentally flings the pan out of the window, as the episode ends.

Features

Characters

Locations

Objects

Music

Videos

We Bare Bears Everyone's Tube Sneak Peek

We Bare Bears Everyone's Tube Sneak Peek

Trivia

  • If one looks closer before the viewer clicks on "SWAGGY SHUFFLE TUTORIAL :]" they can see a video titled "!!CROWBAR JONES TRAILER!!", This may be the trailer to "Crowbar Jones: THE RECKONING" which Panda watched in "Rooms".
  • Both the name and plot of this episode were revealed during an interview with Daniel Chong and The Bears' VAs at SDCC 2016.[2]
  • This episode was scheduled to air on September 29, 2016 originally, but it ended up getting delayed for an unknown reason.
  • Multiple photos of The Bears as cubs can be seen hanging on the wall of the laundry room during the Ice is Floeing video. The most notable image is of the Baby Bears sitting in their box.
  • This is the first episode to feature Chloe singing.
  • The Bears' Everyone's Tube channel is bear_vid$.
  • The longest video shown is FOREVER MY HEART (official music video) which has a length of approximately 3:09.
  • The mysterious Everyone's Tube user watching the videos is never revealed. However, they do not seem to particular like Grizzly, since they down-voted all of his videos.
    • This is shown when the viewer down-votes every single one of Grizzly's videos that pop up, including xx mr.hello friend xx, which the viewer didn't even bother finishing.
  • There is a video in the background called "Epic Panda Prank" with a thumbnail of Grizz scaring Panda.
  • Everyone's Tube is a parody of YouTube.
  • The sequel to this episode, More Everyone's Tube has been released.

Cultural References

  • During Grizzly's video, DJ G'RIZZY BEATS 🔥🔥, an annotation near the end that pops up names a parody of the popular social media service Twitter, named Tooter.
    • While one of the other annotations that says "Music Vapor" is a parody of "SoundCloud."
  • Panda's music video, FOREVER MY HEART, references the music video for the Boys II Men song "I'll Make Love To You", particularly the various outfits worn by Panda.
  • Ice Bear's video is a tribute to the music video for Fatboy Slim's "Weapon of Choice," starring Christopher Walken.
  • When "funny lip sync video" is typed into the search bar, we see a video titled "'Downtown Groove' in car funny lip sync". "Downtown Groove" is a parody of the song "Uptown Funk" by Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars.
    • The idea of lip syncing in the car could possibly be a reference to "Carpool Karaoke".
  • The song that Grizzly does a video to, "Mr. Hello Friend", is likely a parody of the song "Mr. Roboto" by Styx.

Errors

  • When Chloe is seen playing the piano, the notes she plays do not match the key of the song.

References

Sours: https://webarebears.fandom.com/wiki/Everyone%27s_Tube_(episode)

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