2 kings 8 nkjv

2 Kings 8 New King James Version

The Shunammite Woman's Land Restored

81 Then Elisha spoke to the woman whose son he had restored to life, saying, "Arise and go, you and your household, and stay wherever you can; for the Lord has called for a famine, and furthermore, it will come upon the land for seven years." 2 So the woman arose and did according to the saying of the man of God, and she went with her household and dwelt in the land of the Philistines seven years. 3 It came to pass, at the end of seven years, that the woman returned from the land of the Philistines; and she went to make an appeal to the king for her house and for her land. 4 Then the king talked with Gehazi, the servant of the man of God, saying, "Tell me, please, all the great things Elisha has done." 5 Now it happened, as he was telling the king how he had restored the dead to life, that there was the woman whose son he had restored to life, appealing to the king for her house and for her land. And Gehazi said, "My lord, O king, this is the woman, and this is her son whom Elisha restored to life." 6 And when the king asked the woman, she told him. So the king appointed a certain officer for her, saying, "Restore all that was hers, and all the proceeds of the field from the day that she left the land until now."

Hazael Becomes King of Syria

7 Then Elisha went to Damascus, and Ben-Hadad king of Syria was sick; and it was told him, saying, "The man of God has come here." 8 And the king said to Hazael, "Take a present in your hand, and go to meet the man of God, and inquire of the Lord by him, saying, 'Shall I recover from this disease?' " 9 So Hazael went to meet him and took a present with him, of every good thing of Damascus, forty camel-loads; and he came and stood before him, and said, "Your son Ben-Hadad king of Syria has sent me to you, saying, 'Shall I recover from this disease?' " 10 And Elisha said to him, "Go, say to him, 'You shall certainly recover.' However the Lord has shown me that he will really die." 11 Then he set his countenance in a stare until he was ashamed; and the man of God wept. 12 And Hazael said, "Why is my lord weeping?" He answered, "Because I know the evil that you will do to the children of Israel: Their strongholds you will set on fire, and their young men you will kill with the sword; and you will dash their children, and rip open their women with child." 13 So Hazael said, "But what is your servant--a dog, that he should do this gross thing?" And Elisha answered, "The Lord has shown me that you will become king over Syria." 14 Then he departed from Elisha, and came to his master, who said to him, "What did Elisha say to you?" And he answered, "He told me you would surely recover." 15 But it happened on the next day that he took a thick cloth and dipped it in water, and spread it over his face so that he died; and Hazael reigned in his place.

The Reign of Jehoram of Judah

16 Now in the fifth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Jehoshaphat having been king of Judah, Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat began to reign as king of Judah. 17 He was thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned eight years in Jerusalem. 18 And he walked in the way of the kings of Israel, just as the house of Ahab had done, for the daughter of Ahab was his wife; and he did evil in the sight of the Lord. 19 Yet the Lord would not destroy Judah, for the sake of his servant David, as He promised him to give a lamp to him and his sons forever. 20 In his days Edom revolted against Judah's authority, and made a king over themselves. 21 So Joram went to Zair, and all his chariots with him. Then he rose by night and attacked the Edomites who had surrounded him and the captains of the chariots; and the troops fled to their tents. 22 Thus Edom has been in revolt against Judah's authority to this day. And Libnah revolted at that time. 23 Now the rest of the acts of Joram, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah? 24 So Joram rested with his fathers, and was buried with his fathers in the City of David. Then Ahaziah his son reigned in his place.

The Reign of Ahaziah of Judah

25 In the twelfth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Ahaziah the son of Jehoram, king of Judah, began to reign. 26 Ahaziah was twenty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned one year in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Athaliah the granddaughter of Omri, king of Israel. 27 And he walked in the way of the house of Ahab, and did evil in the sight of the Lord, like the house of Ahab, for he was the son-in-law of the house of Ahab. 28 Now he went with Joram the son of Ahab to war against Hazael king of Syria at Ramoth Gilead; and the Syrians wounded Joram. 29 Then King Joram went back to Jezreel to recover from the wounds which the Syrians had inflicted on him at Ramah, when he fought against Hazael king of Syria. And Ahaziah the son of Jehoram, king of Judah, went down to see Joram the son of Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.

Sours: https://www.christianity.com/bible/bible.php?q=2+Kings+8&ver=nkjv&layout=2

Audio Bible - KJV

Summary of the Book of 2 Kings

This summary of the book of 2 Kings provides information about the title, author(s), date of writing, chronology, theme, theology, outline, a brief overview, and the chapters of the Book of 2 Kings.

Outline

Below is an outline for 2 Kings. For an outline of both 1 and 2 Kings see Introduction to 1 Kings: Outline.

  • see 1 Kings Outline
  • see 1 Kings Outline
  • see 1 Kings Outline
  • The Ministries of Elijah and Elisha during the Reigns of Ahaziah and Joram (1:1;8:15)
    • Elijah in the Reign of Ahaziah (ch. 1)
    • Elijah's Translation; Elisha's Inauguration (2:1-18)
    • Elisha in the Reign of Joram (2:19;8:15)
      • Elisha's initial miraculous signs (2:19-25)
      • Elisha during the campaign against Moab (ch. 3)
      • Elisha's ministry to needy ones in Israel (ch. 4)
      • Elisha heals Naaman (ch. 5)
      • Elisha's deliverance of one of the prophets (6:1-7)
      • Elisha's deliverance of Joram from Aramean raiders (6:8-23)
      • Aramean siege of Samaria lifted, as Elisha prophesied (6:24;7:20)
      • The Shunammite's land restored (8:1-6)
      • Elisha prophesies Hazael's oppression of Israel (8:7-15)
  • Israel and Judah from Joram/Jehoram to the Exile of Israel (8:16;17:41)
    • Jehoram of Judah (8:16-24)
    • Ahaziah of Judah (8:25-29)
    • Jehu's Revolt and Reign (chs. 9-10)
      • Elisha orders Jehu's anointing (9:1-13)
      • Jehu's assassination of Joram and Ahaziah (9:14-29)
      • Jehu's execution of Jezebel (9:30-37)
      • Jehu's slaughter of Ahab's family (10:1-17)
      • Jehu's eradication of Baal worship (10:18-36)
    • Athaliah and Joash of Judah; Repair of the Temple (chs. 11-12)
    • Jehoahaz of Israel (13:1-9)
    • Jehoash of Israel; Elisha's Last Prophecy (13:10-25)
    • Amaziah of Judah (14:1-22)
    • Jeroboam II of Israel (14:23-29)
    • Azariah of Judah (15:1-7)
    • Zechariah of Israel (15:8-12)
    • Shallum of Israel (15:13-16)
    • Menahem of Israel (15:17-22)
    • Pekahiah of Israel (15:23-26)
    • Pekah of Israel (15:27-31)
    • Jotham of Judah (15:32-38)
    • Ahaz of Judah (ch. 16)
    • Hoshea of Israel (17:1-6)
    • Exile of Israel; Resettlement of the Land (17:7-41)
  • Judah from Hezekiah to the Babylonian Exile (chs. 18-25)
    • Hezekiah (chs. 18-20)
      • Hezekiah's good reign (18:1-8)
      • The Assyrian threat and deliverance (18:9;19:37)
      • Hezekiah's illness and alliance with Babylon (ch. 20)
    • Manasseh (21:1-18)
    • Amon (21:19-26)
    • Josiah (22:1;23:30)
      • Repair of the temple; discovery of the Book of the Law (ch. 22)
      • Renewal of the covenant; end of Josiah's reign (23:1-30)
    • Jehoahaz Exiled to Egypt (23:31-35)
    • Jehoiakim: First Babylonian Deportation (23:36;24:7)
    • Jehoiachin: Second Babylonian Deportation (24:8-17)
    • Zedekiah: Third Babylonian Deportation (24:18;25:21)
    • Removal of the Remnant to Egypt (25:22-26)
    • Elevation of Jehoiachin in Babylon (25:27-30)

From the NIV Study Bible, Introductions to the Books of the Bible, 2 Kings
Copyright 2002 © Zondervan. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/audio-bible/kjv/2-kings/8.html
  1. Dixie queen number
  2. Tractor spark plugs
  3. New namm 2017
  4. Fn 15 series nails

2 Kings 8:8

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading comparison.

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading the book.

Sorry, you don't have permission to view that book.

No matches.

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading part of the book.

An error occurred while marking the devotional as read.

An error occurred while accessing favorites

What does the Great Commission have to do with mobile devices? More than you might think.

Learn more

8 And the king said to gHazael, h“Take a present in your hand, and go to meet the man of God, and iinquire of the Lord by him, saying, ‘Shall I recover from this disease?’ ”

Read more Share



2 Kings 8:8 — The New International Version (NIV)

8 he said to Hazael, “Take a gift with you and go to meet the man of God. Consult the Lord through him; ask him, ‘Will I recover from this illness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — English Standard Version (ESV)

8 the king said to Hazael, “Take a present with you and go to meet the man of God, and inquire of the Lord through him, saying, ‘Shall I recover from this sickness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — King James Version (KJV 1900)

8 And the king said unto Hazael, Take a present in thine hand, and go, meet the man of God, and inquire of the Lord by him, saying, Shall I recover of this disease?

2 Kings 8:8 — New Living Translation (NLT)

8 the king said to Hazael, “Take a gift to the man of God. Then tell him to ask the Lord, ‘Will I recover from this illness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — New Century Version (NCV)

8 The king said to Hazael, “Take a gift in your hand and go meet him. Ask the Lord through him if I will recover from my sickness.”

2 Kings 8:8 — American Standard Version (ASV 1901)

8 And the king said unto Hazael, Take a present in thy hand, and go, meet the man of God, and inquire of Jehovah by him, saying, Shall I recover of this sickness?

2 Kings 8:8 — 1890 Darby Bible (DARBY)

8 And the king said to Hazael, Take a present in thy hand, and go, meet the man of God, and inquire of Jehovah by him, saying, Shall I recover from this disease?

2 Kings 8:8 — GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

8 The king told Hazael, “Take a present, and meet the man of God. Ask the Lord through him, ‘Will I recover from this illness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

8 So the king said to Hazael, “Take a gift with you and go meet the man of God. Inquire of the Lord through him, ‘Will I recover from this sickness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

8 the king said to Hazael, “Take a present with you and go to meet the man of God. Inquire of the Lord through him, whether I shall recover from this illness.”

2 Kings 8:8 — The Lexham English Bible (LEB)

8 Then the king said to Hazael, “Take a gift in your hand and go meet the man of God. Inquire of Yahweh from him, saying, ‘Shall I recover from this illness?’ ”

2 Kings 8:8 — New International Reader’s Version (NIrV)

8 Then the king said to Hazael, “Take a gift with you. Go and see the man of God. Ask him for the Lord’s advice. Ask him whether I will get well again.”

2 Kings 8:8 — New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (NASB95)

8 The kingsaid to Hazael, “Take a gift in your hand and go to meet the man of God, and inquire of the Lord by him, saying, ‘Will I recover from thissickness?’ ”


A service of Faithlife / Logos Bible Software

Sours: https://biblia.com/bible/nkjv/2-kings/8/8

The Shunammite's Land Restored

2 Kings 8

1Then Elisha spoke to the woman a whose son he had restored to life, saying, "Arise and go, you and your household, and stay wherever you can; for the LORD b has called for a c famine, and furthermore, it will come upon the land for seven years."2So the woman arose and did according to the saying of the man of God, and she went with her household and dwelt in the land of the Philistines seven years.3It came to pass, at the end of seven years, that the woman returned from the land of the Philistines; and she went to make an appeal to the king for her house and for her land.4Then the king talked with d Gehazi, the servant of the man of God, saying, "Tell me, please, all the great things Elisha has done."5Now it happened, as he was telling the king how he had restored the dead to life, that there was the woman whose son he had e restored to life, appealing to the king for her house and for her land. And Gehazi said, "My lord, O king, this is the woman, and this is her son whom Elisha restored to life."6And when the king asked the woman, she told him. So the king appointed a certain officer for her, saying, "Restore all that was hers, and all the proceeds of the field from the day that she left the land until now."

  1. Cross References
    2 Kings 4:18
    And the child grew. Now it happened one day that he went out to his father, to the reapers.
    2 Kings 4:31 - 35
    Now Gehazi went on ahead of them, and laid the staff on the face of the child; but there was neither voice nor hearing. Therefore he went back to meet him, and told him, saying, "The child has not awakened.
  2. Cross References
    Psalms 105:16
    Moreover He called for a famine in the land; He destroyed all the provision of bread.
    Haggai 1:11
    "For I called for a drought on the land and the mountains, on the grain and the new wine and the oil, on whatever the ground brings forth, on men and livestock, and on all the labor of your hands."
  3. Cross References
    2 Samuel 21:1
    Now there was a famine in the days of David for three years, year after year; and David inquired of the LORD. And the LORD answered, " It is because of Saul and his bloodthirsty house, because he killed the Gibeonites.
    1 Kings 18:2
    So Elijah went to present himself to Ahab; and there was a severe famine in Samaria.
    2 Kings 4:38
    And Elisha returned to Gilgal, and there was a famine in the land. Now the sons of the prophets were sitting before him; and he said to his servant, "Put on the large pot, and boil stew for the sons of the prophets.
    2 Kings 6:25
    And there was a great famine in Samaria; and indeed they besieged it until a donkey's head was sold for eighty shekels of silver, and one-fourth of a kab of dove droppings for five shekels of silver.
  4. Cross References
    2 Kings 4:12
    Then he said to Gehazi his servant, "Call this Shunammite woman." When he had called her, she stood before him.
    2 Kings 5:20 - 27
    But Gehazi, the servant of Elisha the man of God, said, "Look, my master has spared Naaman this Syrian, while not receiving from his hands what he brought; but as the LORD lives, I will run after him and take something from him.
  5. Cross References
    2 Kings 4:35
    He returned and walked back and forth in the house, and again went up and stretched himself out on him; then the child sneezed seven times, and the child opened his eyes.
New King James Version (NKJV) Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

Notes

Sours: https://ebible.com/nkjv/section/621

Kings nkjv 2 8

2 Kings 8

New King James Version

The King Restores the Shunammite’s Land

8 Then Elisha spoke to the woman (A)whose son he had restored to life, saying, “Arise and go, you and your household, and stay wherever you can; for the Lord(B)has called for a (C)famine, and furthermore, it will come upon the land for seven years.” So the woman arose and did according to the saying of the man of God, and she went with her household and dwelt in the land of the Philistines seven years.

It came to pass, at the end of seven years, that the woman returned from the land of the Philistines; and she went to make an appeal to the king for her house and for her land. Then the king talked with (D)Gehazi, the servant of the man of God, saying, “Tell me, please, all the great things Elisha has done.” Now it happened, as he was telling the king how he had restored the dead to life, that there was the woman whose son he had (E)restored to life, appealing to the king for her house and for her land. And Gehazi said, “My lord, O king, this is the woman, and this is her son whom Elisha restored to life.” And when the king asked the woman, she told him.

So the king appointed a certain officer for her, saying, “Restore all that was hers, and all the proceeds of the field from the day that she left the land until now.”

Death of Ben-Hadad

Then Elisha went to Damascus, and (F)Ben-Hadad king of Syria was sick; and it was told him, saying, “The man of God has come here.” And the king said to (G)Hazael, (H)“Take a present in your hand, and go to meet the man of God, and (I)inquire of the Lord by him, saying, ‘Shall I recover from this disease?’ ” So (J)Hazael went to meet him and took a present with him, of every good thing of Damascus, forty camel-loads; and he came and stood before him, and said, “Your son Ben-Hadad king of Syria has sent me to you, saying, ‘Shall I recover from this disease?’ ”

10 And Elisha said to him, “Go, say to him, ‘You shall certainly recover.’ However the Lord has shown me that (K)he will really die.” 11 Then he set his countenance in a stare until he was ashamed; and the man of God (L)wept. 12 And Hazael said, “Why is my lord weeping?”

He answered, “Because I know (M)the evil that you will do to the children of Israel: Their strongholds you will set on fire, and their young men you will kill with the sword; and you (N)will dash their children, and rip open their women with child.”

13 So Hazael said, “But what (O)is your servant—a dog, that he should do this gross thing?”

And Elisha answered, (P)“The Lord has shown me that you will become king over Syria.”

14 Then he departed from Elisha, and came to his master, who said to him, “What did Elisha say to you?” And he answered, “He told me you would surely recover.” 15 But it happened on the next day that he took a thick cloth and dipped it in water, and spread it over his face so that he died; and Hazael reigned in his place.

Jehoram Reigns in Judah(Q)

16 Now (R)in the fifth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Jehoshaphat having been king of Judah, (S)Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat began to reign as king of Judah. 17 He was (T)thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned eight years in Jerusalem. 18 And he walked in the way of the kings of Israel, just as the house of Ahab had done, for (U)the daughter of Ahab was his wife; and he did evil in the sight of the Lord. 19 Yet the Lord would not destroy Judah, for the sake of His servant David, (V)as He promised him to give a lamp to him and his sons forever.

20 In his days (W)Edom revolted against Judah’s authority, (X)and made a king over themselves. 21 So Joram went to Zair, and all his chariots with him. Then he rose by night and attacked the Edomites who had surrounded him and the captains of the chariots; and the troops fled to their tents. 22 Thus Edom has been in revolt against Judah’s authority to this day. (Y)And Libnah revolted at that time.

23 Now the rest of the acts of Joram, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah? 24 So Joram rested with his fathers, and was buried with his fathers in the City of David. Then (Z)Ahaziah his son reigned in his place.

Ahaziah Reigns in Judah(AA)

25 In the twelfth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Ahaziah the son of Jehoram, king of Judah, began to reign. 26 Ahaziah was(AB)twenty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned one year in Jerusalem. His mother’s name was Athaliah the granddaughter of Omri, king of Israel. 27 (AC)And he walked in the way of the house of Ahab, and did evil in the sight of the Lord, like the house of Ahab, for he was the son-in-law of the house of Ahab.

28 Now he went (AD)with Joram the son of Ahab to war against Hazael king of Syria at (AE)Ramoth Gilead; and the Syrians wounded Joram. 29 Then (AF)King Joram went back to Jezreel to recover from the wounds which the Syrians had inflicted on him at Ramah, when he fought against Hazael king of Syria. (AG)And Ahaziah the son of Jehoram, king of Judah, went down to see Joram the son of Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.

Sours: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=2%20Kings%208&version=NKJV

2 Kings 8

2 Kings 8 is the eighth chapter of the second part of the Books of Kings in the Hebrew Bible or the Second Book of Kings in the Old Testament of the ChristianBible. The book is a compilation of various annals recording the acts of the kings of Israel and Judah by a Deuteronomic compiler in the seventh century BCE, with a supplement added in the sixth century BCE. This chapter records Elisha's acts in helping the family of Shunammite woman to escape famine, then to gain back their land (verses 1–6) and in contributing to Hazael's ascension to the throne of Syria (Aram) in verses 7–15; then subsequently records the reigns of Joram and Ahaziah, the kings of Judah.

Text[edit]

This chapter was originally written in the Hebrew language and since the 16th century is divided into 29 verses.

Textual witnesses[edit]

Some early manuscripts containing the text of this chapter in Hebrew are of the Masoretic Text tradition, which includes the Codex Cairensis (895), Aleppo Codex (10th century), and Codex Leningradensis (1008). Fragments containing parts of this chapter in Hebrew were found among the Dead Sea Scrolls, that is, 6Q4 (6QpapKgs; 150–75 BCE) with extant verses 1–5.[6][7][8][9]

There is also a translation into Koine Greek known as the Septuagint, made in the last few centuries BCE. Extant ancient manuscripts of the Septuagint version include Codex Vaticanus (B; {\displaystyle {\mathfrak {G}}}B; 4th century) and Codex Alexandrinus (A; {\displaystyle {\mathfrak {G}}}A; 5th century).[a]

Locations[edit]

This chapter mentions or alludes to the following places (in order of appearance):

Elisha helps a refugee (8:1–6)[edit]

The part is a continuation to the story of the Shunammite woman in 4:8–37. Elisha foresees famine, warns the woman, and recommends her and her family to leave the area until the famine ends (cf. the stories of Ruth and Joseph and the so-called "economic refugees" today). On her return seven years later she found that her property belongs to someone else, probably fell into the crown's hands since it had no owner for a while (as there is no record of a dispute with neighbors). The woman appeals to the king who returns her the land on hearing of her connections with Elisha after being impressed by Elisha's miracle-working power told by Elisha's servant Gehazi.

Verse 1[edit]

See also: Raising of the son of the woman of Shunem

Then Elisha spoke to the woman whose son he had restored to life, saying, "Arise and go, you and your household, and stay wherever you can; for the Lord has called for a famine, and furthermore, it will come upon the land for seven years."[14]
  • ”Stay wherever you can”: lit.in Hebrew “live temporarily where you can live temporarily”.[15]

Elisha triggers a change of power in Damascus (8:7–15)[edit]

The events that continue to 2 Kings 9–10 form one of two political stories placed at the end of the Elisha cycle (the other in 2 Kings 13:14–21). The Aramean king, named here as Benhadad, becomes seriously ill and sends his general Hazael to Elisha, who was in Damascus at that time, to request an oracle. Elisha's reply is puzzling: Hazael should tell the king he will recover although he will also die (verse 10), which is clarified a little later: the king would have survived his illness (verse 14), but would not survive Hazael's assassination attempt (verse 15). Hazael's brutality against Israel was also revealed by the prophet (verses 11–13; cf. 1 Kings 19:17; 2 Kings 8:28; 10:32–33; 12:17–18; 13:3; Amos 1:3). It is a tragic future event that Elisha could not prevent to happen while the agent of destruction himself was before him at that moment. During the last year's of Benhadad' reign the relationship between Israel and Aram was relaxed, but the change of power in Damascus dramatically worsened it. The war between Hazael and Israel shortly after his accession leads to the Omride Joram's wounding and his murder (followed by the murder of Ahaziah of Judah) by general Jehu. Hazael as an instrument of vengeance against Ahab's family was mentioned during the encounter of YHWH and Elijah at Mount Sinai (1 Kings 19).

Structure of 8:7–15[edit]

A chiastic structure is observed in this part with the focus of attention on the central dialogue between Hazael and Elisha, as follows:

A Introduction: sickness of Ben-hadad (verse 7)
B Ben-hadad commissions Hazael (verse 8)
C Hazael goes to Elisha (verse 9a)
X Hazael and Elisha dialogue (verses 9b-13)
C' Hazael returns to Ben-hadad (verse 14)
B' Ben-hadad receives Hazael (verse 14)
A' Conclusion: death of Ben-hadad (verse 15)

Verse 7[edit]

Then Elisha went to Damascus, and Ben-Hadad king of Syria was sick; and it was told him, saying, "The man of God has come here."[18]

Verse 13[edit]

The statue of the Aramaean king Hazael from Arslan Tash.
So Hazael said, "But what is your servant—a dog, that he should do this gross thing?"
And Elisha answered, "The Lord has shown me that you will become king over Syria."[20]

Elisha carries out the anointing of Hazael according to the divine commission to Elijah, his predecessor, in 1 King's 19:15.

  • "A dog": Hazael's own description of his obscure origin was attested in an Assyrian source which states that he was the "son of nobody".
  • "Syria": in Hebrew: אֲרָֽם‎, ’ă-rām,[23] referring to Aram Damascus.

Verse 15[edit]

Ivory Plaque Mentioning Hazael in Aramaic language, from Arslan Tash (ancient Hadatu), end of the ninth century B.C.E., now in Louvre (room C, ground floor, Sully Wing, section 4), identification number AO 11489.
But the next day he took a blanket, dipped it in water, and spread it on his face, so that he died. And Hazael reigned in his place.[24]

Hazael (reigns c. 842–800 BCE),[27] seized Israelite territory east of the Jordan River, and the Philistine city of Gath, but unsuccessful to take Jerusalem (2 Kings 12:17–18). His death is mentioned in 2 Kings 13:24. Decorated bronze plaques from chariot horse-harness belonged to Hazael, identified by their inscriptions, have been found as re-gifted votive objects at two Greek sites, the Heraion of Samos and in the temple of Apollo at Eretria on Euboea. The inscriptions read "that which Hadad gave to our lord Hazael from 'Umq in the year that our lord crossed the River",[28] which may refer to Orontes river.

King Joram of Judah (8:16–24)[edit]

Joram (or "Jehoram") got the 'harshest possible verdict' among the descendants of David in this book: placed on the same level as the kings of Israel, and especially 'the house of Ahab'. He was married to the Omride princess Athaliah, who was not merely one wife among others, but became the queen mother when her son Ahaziah came to the throne (cf. verses 18 and 26). The tense relationship between Judah and Israel after their separation (cf. e.g. 1 Kings 14:30; 15:16) clearly turned to a peaceful one during the time of the Omri dynasty, along with the northern religious supremacy over the south. The link between Judah and the sinful kingdom of Israel could have brought the kingdom of Judah down, but God in his faithfulness to the Davidic covenant (2 Samuel 7:11–16) mercifully spared them (verse 19). Nevertheless, Judah lost the territory of Edom, after the Edomites heavily defeated Joram's troops and achieved independence (cf. 1 Kings 22:48; 2 Kings 3:8-9).

Verse 16[edit]

And in the fifth year of Joram the son of Ahab king of Israel, Jehoshaphat being then king of Judah, Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat king of Judah began to reign.[30]

Verse 17[edit]

He was thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned eight years in Jerusalem.[33]
  • Cross references: 2 Chronicles 21:5, 20
  • "He reigned eight years": based on Thiele-McFall calculation, Jehoram of Judah reigned from between April and September 848 BCE until his death between April and September 841 BCE. Unlike with his predecessors, Jehoram's reign is counted using the 'non-accession year method', which is commonly used only by the kings of the northern kingdom.[34]

King Ahaziah of Judah (8:25–29)[edit]

Ahaziah is depicted as bad as his father Joram (and his mother, the Omride Athaliah), although he only reigned for one year. He was soon involved in a war with Aram, in alliance with his uncle, Jehoram of Israel, centered upon Ramoth, a town on the border between Israelite Gilead and Aram's territory to the north ('Israel had been on guard at Ramoth-gilead against King Hazael' in 9:14). The repeated reports of 8:28–29 in 9:14–15a, and in 9:16 may indicate that the narrative could stem from three different sources: the annals of Judah and Israel, as well as a separate record on Jehu.

Verse 25[edit]

In the twelfth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Ahaziah the son of Jehoram, king of Judah, began to reign.[35]
  • "In the twelfth year of Joram the son of Ahab": following the non-accession year method, Thiele calculates that Ahaziah the son of Jehoram of Judah became the sole king of Judah between April and September 841 BCE after the death of his father.2 Kings 9:29 provides the information that Ahaziah was already a co-regent with his father since the year before ("the 11th year of Joram the son of Ahab") in the month of Tishrei (September) 842 BCE. The mention of "11th year" and "12th year" gives Thiele the initial clue on how to unravel the chronology of the Hebrew kings.[38]

Verse 26[edit]

Ahaziah was twenty-two years old when he began to reign, and he reigned one year in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Athaliah; she was a granddaughter of Omri king of Israel.[39]
  • "He reigned one year": based on Thiele-McFall calculation Ahaziah started to be a sole king of Judah between April and September 841 BCE and died in the same period of his first year as king (following the non-accession year method).
  • "Granddaughter": from Hebrew בַּת (bat), lit. “daughter,” but also can refer to a granddaughter like here.[40]

Verse 28[edit]

He went with Joram the son of Ahab to the war against Hazael king of Aram at Ramoth Gilead, and the Arameans struck Joram.[41]

The inscription by Hazael the king of Aram (Syria) in the Tel Dan Stele stated that after the death of his father 'the king of Israel invaded, advancing in my father's land' (lines 3–4). It corresponds well with 2 Kings 8:28a stating that the kings of Israel and Judah launched a campaign and attacked the Aramaeans at Ramoth-gilead.[42] The city was soon occupied by Hazael for the whole period of his reign, but would be in Israelite hands again thereafter (cf. 2 Kings 13:25; 14:25, 28; Amos 6:13).[42]

Verse 29[edit]

And King Joram returned to be healed in Jezreel of the wounds that the Syrians had given him at Ramah, when he fought against Hazael king of Syria. And Ahaziah the son of Jehoram king of Judah went down to see Joram the son of Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.[43]

Relation to the Tel Dan Stele[edit]

Main article: Tel Dan Stele

Tel Dan Stele, a fragmentary stele from the 9th century BCE was discovered in 1993 (first fragment) and 1994 (two smaller fragments) in Tel-Dan.[45] The stele contains several lines of Aramaic detailing that the author of the inscription (likely Hazael, an Aramean king from the same period) killed both Jehoram, the son of Ahab, king of Israel, and Ahaziah, the son of Jehoram, the king of the house of David.[46][47][48][49] This artifact is currently on display at the Israel Museum,[50] and is known as KAI 310.

Although the part containing the name of the Israelite king is not complete, the only king, either of Israel or of Judah, whose name ends with resh and mem is Jehoram, who is either a son of Ahab, king of Israel, or a son of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah.[51] The letters y-h-u, followed by b-n, 'the son of', must belong to a Hebrew theophorous name and in the ninth century BCE, the two royal names ending with -yah(u)" were Ahazyah(u)" (Ahaziah) and "Atalyah(u)" (Ataliah; becoming queen of Judah after her son Ahaziah), so the only name of the king is Ahaziah.[51] The name “Ahaziah” can refer to a king of Israel and a king of Judah, but only one can be taken into consideration: the son of Jehoram and grandson of Jehoshaphat, who ruled in Judah for one year (2 Kings 8:25–26) and was the ally of Jehoram of Israel. After Hazael seized the throne from Ben Hadad II, king of Aram-Damascus, he fought Jehoram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah at Ramoth Gilead (2 Kings 8:7-15, 28; 2 Chronicles 22:5) and wounded Jehoram (according to 2 Kings 9:24–28, both Jehoram and Ahaziah were slain by Jehu shortly after). Thus, this stele is to be attributed to the campaign of Hazael.[51]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Ulrich, Eugene, ed. (2010). The Biblical Qumran Scrolls: Transcriptions and Textual Variants. Brill. p. 329.
  2. ^Dead sea scrolls - 2 Kings
  3. ^Fitzmyer, Joseph A. (2008). A Guide to the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. pp. 104, 106. ISBN .
  4. ^6Q4 at the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library
  5. ^ This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Codex Sinaiticus". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  6. ^2 Kings 8:1NKJV
  7. ^Note on 2 Kings 8:1 in NET Bible
  8. ^2 Kings 8:7 NKJV
  9. ^Grayson, A. (1996). Assyrian Rulers of the Early First Millennium BC II (858-745). Toronto: University of Toronto Press. p. 118. ISBN .
  10. ^2 Kings 8:13 NKJV
  11. ^Hebrew Text Analysis: 2 Kings 8:13. Biblehub
  12. ^2 Kings 8:15MEV
  13. ^Note [a] on 2 Kings 8:15 in NET Bible
  14. ^Note [b] on 2 Kings 8:15 in NET Bible
  15. ^David Noel Freedman; Allen C. Myers (31 December 2000). Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible. Amsterdam University Press. p. 84. ISBN .
  16. ^I. Eph'al and J. Naveh, "Hazael's booty inscriptions", Israel Exploration Journal39 (1989:192-200).
  17. ^2 Kings 8:16KJV
  18. ^Thiele, Edwin R., The Mysterious Numbers of the Hebrew Kings, (1st ed.; New York: Macmillan, 1951; 2d ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965; 3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan/Kregel, 1983). ISBN 0-8254-3825-X, 9780825438257
  19. ^2 Kings 8:17 MEV
  20. ^Thiele 1951, pp. 98, 100
  21. ^2 Kings 8:25ESV
  22. ^Thiele 1951, p. 40
  23. ^2 Kings 8:26 ESV
  24. ^See HALOT 166 s.v. בַּת. Note on 2 Kings 8:26 in NET Bible
  25. ^2 Kings 8:28 MEV
  26. ^ abNaʾaman, Nadav (2006). "The Story of Jehu's Rebellion: Hazael's Inscription and the Biblical Narrative". Israel Exploration Journal. 56 (2): 160–166. JSTOR 27927140.
  27. ^2 Kings 8:29 ESV
  28. ^Note on 2 Kings 8:29 in NKJV
  29. ^Biran, A., and Naveh, J. (1993) An Aramaic Stele Fragment from Tel Dan. Israel Exploration Journal 43: 81–98; Biran, A., and Naveh, J. (1995) The Tel Dan Inscription: A New Fragment. Israel Exploration Journal 45: 1–18.
  30. ^Hovee, Eric (2009-01-14). "Tel Dan Stele". Center for Online Judaic Studies. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  31. ^Mykytiuk, Lawrence J. (2004). Identifying Biblical Persons in Northwest Semitic Inscriptions of 1200–539 B.C.E. Society of Biblical Literature. p. 113
  32. ^Hagelia, Hallvard (2005). "Philological Issues in the Tel Dan Inscription". In: Edzard, Lutz; Retso, Jan. Current Issues in the Analysis of Semitic Grammar and Lexicon. Otto Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 235
  33. ^Wood, Bryant G. The Tel Dan Stela and the Kings of Aram and IsraelArchived 2017-09-24 at the Wayback Machine - Associates for Biblical Research, May 04, 2011.
  34. ^"Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Archaeology Wing". The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Archived from the original on 12 August 2011. Retrieved 26 August 2011.
  35. ^ abcBiran, Avraham; Naveh, Joseph (1995). "The Tel Dan Inscription: A New Fragment". Israel Exploration Journal. Israel Exploration Society. 45 (1): 1–18. JSTOR 27926361.

Sources[edit]

  • Cohn, Robert L. (2000). Cotter, David W.; Walsh, Jerome T.; Franke, Chris (eds.). 2 Kings. Berit Olam (The Everlasting Covenant): Studies In Hebrew Narrative And Poetry. Liturgical Press. ISBN .
  • Collins, John J. (2014). "Chapter 14: 1 Kings 12 – 2 Kings 25". Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures. Fortress Press. pp. 277–296. ISBN .
  • Coogan, Michael David (2007). Coogan, Michael David; Brettler, Marc Zvi; Newsom, Carol Ann; Perkins, Pheme (eds.). The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books: New Revised Standard Version, Issue 48 (Augmented 3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN .
  • Dietrich, Walter (2007). "13. 1 and 2 Kings". In Barton, John; Muddiman, John (eds.). The Oxford Bible Commentary (first (paperback) ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 232–266. ISBN . Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  • Halley, Henry H. (1965). Halley's Bible Handbook: an abbreviated Bible commentary (24th (revised) ed.). Zondervan Publishing House. ISBN .
  • Leithart, Peter J. (2006). 1 & 2 Kings. Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible. Brazos Press. ISBN .
  • McFall, Leslie (1991), "Translation Guide to the Chronological Data in Kings and Chronicles"(PDF), Bibliotheca Sacra, 148: 3–45, archived from the original(PDF) on 2010-07-19
  • McKane, William (1993). "Kings, Book of". In Metzger, Bruce M; Coogan, Michael D (eds.). The Oxford Companion to the Bible. Oxford University Press. pp. 409–413. ISBN .
  • Würthwein, Ernst (1995). The Text of the Old Testament. Translated by Rhodes, Erroll F. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans. ISBN . Retrieved January 26, 2019.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Kings_8

Now discussing:

2 Kings 2:8

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading comparison.

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading the book.

Sorry, you don't have permission to view that book.

No matches.

Sorry, an error was encountered while loading part of the book.

An error occurred while marking the devotional as read.

An error occurred while accessing favorites

What does the Great Commission have to do with mobile devices? More than you might think.

Learn more

8 Now Elijah took his mantle, rolled it up, and struck the water; and fit was divided this way and that, so that the two of them crossed over on dry gground.

Read more Share



2 Kings 2:8 — The New International Version (NIV)

8 Elijah took his cloak, rolled it up and struck the water with it. The water divided to the right and to the left, and the two of them crossed over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — English Standard Version (ESV)

8 Then Elijah took his cloak and rolled it up and struck the water, and the water was parted to the one side and to the other, till the two of them could go over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — King James Version (KJV 1900)

8 And Elijah took his mantle, and wrapped it together, and smote the waters, and they were divided hither and thither, so that they two went over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — New Living Translation (NLT)

8 Then Elijah folded his cloak together and struck the water with it. The river divided, and the two of them went across on dry ground!

2 Kings 2:8 — New Century Version (NCV)

8 Elijah took off his coat, rolled it up, and hit the water. The water divided to the right and to the left, and Elijah and Elisha crossed over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — American Standard Version (ASV 1901)

8 And Elijah took his mantle, and wrapped it together, and smote the waters, and they were divided hither and thither, so that they two went over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — 1890 Darby Bible (DARBY)

8 And Elijah took his mantle, and wrapped it together, and smote the waters, and they were divided hither and thither; and they two went over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

8 Elijah took his coat, rolled it up, and struck the water with it. The water divided to their left and their right, and the two men crossed ⌊the river⌋ on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

8 Elijah took his mantle, rolled it up, and struck the waters, which parted to the right and left. Then the two of them crossed over on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

8 Then Elijah took his mantle and rolled it up, and struck the water; the water was parted to the one side and to the other, until the two of them crossed on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — The Lexham English Bible (LEB)

8 Elijah took his cloak, rolled it up, and struck the water. It divided in two, and the two of them crossed over on dry land.

2 Kings 2:8 — New International Reader’s Version (NIrV)

8 Elijah rolled his coat up. Then he struck the water with it. The water parted to the right and to the left. The two of them went across the river on dry ground.

2 Kings 2:8 — New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (NASB95)

8 Elijahtook his mantle and folded it together and struck the waters, and they were dividedhere and there, so that the two of them crossedover on dryground.


A service of Faithlife / Logos Bible Software

Sours: https://biblia.com/bible/nkjv/2-kings/2/8


361 362 363 364 365