Cwd counties missouri

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Chronic Wasting Disease is a contagious, fatal, neurological illness of deer and elk that if allowed to spread, could seriously reduce the deer population in Missouri where hunting is a billion-dollar industry attracting participants from all over the region.

But this weekend it will be mandatory in 11 Missouri counties in our area to present your harvested deer to be checked for CWD at a sampling station.

Those counties include St. Clair, Cedar, Hickory, Polk, Barry, Stone, Christian, Taney, Ozark, Howell and Oregon counties.

Sample station locations and even GPS coordinates can be found in the Department of Conservation's hunting guide. Click

HERE

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"We can't find this disease without the cooperation of the hunters," explained Francis Skalicky, a spokesperson for the Mo. Dept. of Conservation. "Those counties are specified because it's been found there or very close to those counties. We are still ahead of the CWD game here in Missouri. Hunters cooperation has been a huge, huge factor in us being able to stay ahead in the game and we want to stay that way."

The Mo. Dept. of Conservation estimates there are over a million deer in the state and they've sampled about 100,000 since 2002. Just a little more than a hundred have tested positive.

"That's still a pretty small percentage," Skalicky pointed out. "So while it is here, it is here in a very low proportion and the sample collection we're doing the opening weekend of deer season helps us keep a handle on the disease and stay ahead."

While Chronic Wasting Disease can wipe out large deer populations obviously one of the main questions concerns its danger to humans.

So far the Centers for Disease Control has found no cases of humans getting infected with CWD yet according to Skalicky, "They do advise people to not eat meat from a deer that's tested positive for CWD and that's in line with what we've always said. We've advised people to never eat meat from a sick game animal."

Another important note is that the sample stations test the deer by removing the lymph nodes in the neck. So if you plan on having your deer head mounted, tell the officials at the sample station.

"If they say they want it taxidermied, we will not draw a sample from that deer," Skalicky said. "The reason being the cut we make on the neck will ruin that as a taxidermy mount. But with the number of deer coming in we still feel we have a very good chance of finding the disease even without those deer. But you still have to present the deer at the sampling station."

Here are some tips from the MDOC about what you'll need at the sampling stations:

--Field dress and Telecheck your deer before arrival.

--You can bring the carcass or just the head with at least 6 inches of the neck attached. (It is OK to remove the cape before you get to the sampling station.)

--The person who harvested the deer must be present.

-- Be prepared to provide your Conservation Number and point out the location of harvest on a map.

--If using a paper permit, have it detached from the deer for easy access. If using the MO Hunting app, have your permit and Telecheck information readily available.

--Position the deer in your vehicle with the head and neck accessible.

While the MDOC hopes they've held the disease in check, the number of counties in southwest Missouri that are now part of the CWD Management Zone has increased in recent years and there's plenty of reason for concern.

"There is a very large number of CWD positives in Arkansas," Skalicky pointed out. "And that's the cloud on the horizon because some of those cases are close enough to southern Missouri that there could be transference."

Sours: https://www.ky3.com/content/news/11-area-counties-part-of-mandatory-CWD-deer-testing-this-weekend-564776051.html

MDC switches to voluntary CWD testing in 30 counties on opening weekend of deer season


Firearm deer hunters, take note.

Mandatory deer sampling for chronic wasting disease in 30 Missouri counties has been changed to voluntary sampling during the opening weekend of November firearms deer season, according to the Missouri Department of Conservation.

According to MDC, the change was prompted by ongoing cases and public-health concerns in Missouri regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

The change will impact hunters who kill deer during the opening weekend of the November portion of the firearms deer season (Nov. 14 and 15) in any of the 30 CWD Management Zone counties.

Those counties are: Adair, Barry, Cedar, Chariton, Christian, Clark, Crawford, Franklin, Gasconade, Hickory, Howell, Jefferson, Knox, Linn, Macon, Mercer, Oregon, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Putnam, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington.

Food & drink: Greene County restaurant inspections

While CWD sampling is no longer required Nov. 14 and 15 for the 30 counties in its CWD Management Zone, MDC’s 71 CWD sampling stations located throughout the zone will remain open.

MDC encourages hunters to have their deer sampled for CWD on the day a deer is killed.

“CWD represents a great threat to the health of Missouri’s deer and elk herds and to our hunting culture,” said CWD Mandatory Sampling Coordinator Kevyn Wiskirchen. “Sampling deer for CWD allows early detection of the disease and allows for rapid management intervention to slow its spread. Hunters play a critical role in helping MDC find and manage CWD by having their deer sampled.”

Wiskirchen added, “Although sampling is voluntary this year, to help us detect CWD as early as possible and protect the state’s deer herd, we strongly encourage hunters in CWD Management Zone counties to have their deer sampled at one of our stations on opening weekend, or at other locations throughout the duration of deer season.”

Because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, MDC will be taking precautions to ensure the health of both staff and the public during CWD sampling.

Social distancing will be practiced by MDC staff at all stations. MDC staff will wear gloves and face masks at all times. Hunters and those with them will be asked to remain in their vehicles while their deer is being sampled.

Hunters will only be asked to provide the county of harvest and will not be asked to identify on a map where their deer was killed.

MDC asks hunters and others who are exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19, have recently tested positive for COVID-19, or have a known COVID-19 exposure to refrain from visiting CWD sampling stations.

More: Reports: All Regal movie theaters — including downtown Springfield's — temporarily closed

MDC will continue to offer statewide voluntary CWD sampling and testing during the entire deer season at select locations throughout the state, including participating MDC offices, cooperating taxidermists, and new freezer head-drop locations.

Sampling and test results are free. Find locations and more information online at mdc.mo.gov/cwd or by contacting an MDC regional office.

MDC reminds deer hunters to follow carcass movement restrictions when traveling to a sampling station. Learn more at huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/hunting-trapping/wildlife-diseases/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd/carcass-transport-and-disposal.

Before having deer sampled for CWD, MDC requests the following: 

  • Field dress and Telecheck deer before arrival at a sampling station.
  • Bring the carcass or just the head.
  • Position deer in vehicles with heads and necks easily accessible.
  • Capes may be removed in preparation for taxidermy before going to a sampling station.
  • The person who harvested the deer must be present.
  • The hunter’s conservation number will be required, along with county of harvest.
  • If using a paper permit, have it detached from the deer for easy access.
  • If using the MO Hunting app, have permit and Telecheck information available.

CWD is a deadly disease in white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family, called cervids. The disease has no vaccine or cure and eventually kills all cervids it infects, according to MDC.

The CDC recommends not eating meat from animals that test positive for CWD.

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Sours: https://www.news-leader.com/story/sports/outdoors/2020/10/08/mdc-missouri-department-conservation-cwd-deer-season/5924286002/
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Camden, Laclede, McDonald and Pulaski counties added to Chronic Wasting Disease Management Zone


Joe Jerek, Missouri Department of Conservation |  Lake Sun Leader

The Missouri Conservation Commission recently approved proposed regulation changes from the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) related to chronic wasting disease (CWD) surveillance and management efforts. The changes were approved at the Commission’s May 21 open meeting. They add four counties to the CWD Management Zone and reinstate mandatory CWD sampling requirements.

The approved MDC regulations add Camden, Laclede, McDonald, and Pulaski counties to the CWD Management Zone. The four counties were added to the Zone due to CWD being found in or near them. With the additional counties, the CWD Management Zone consists of 34 counties in or near where CWD has been found.

MDC previously reported it confirmed 44 new cases of CWD from more than 15,300 deer tested during the past year. Of the 44 new cases, one was found in Pulaski County, which had no previously known cases of CWD. Due to the detection of CWD in Pulaski County, MDC recommended that Pulaski County and adjacent Camden and Laclede counties be placed in the CWD Management Zone. Due to the detection of a CWD-positive deer in northern Benton County in Arkansas within 10 miles of McDonald County in Missouri, MDC recommended that McDonald County be added to the CWD Management Zone.

The Commission also gave its approval to reinstate mandatory CWD sampling for the coming deer season. Counties designated for mandatory CWD sampling must be approved by the Commission each year. As a result of COVID-19, MDC waived the mandatory sampling requirement for last year’s opening weekend.

Hunters who harvest deer in any counties of the CWD Management Zone during the opening weekend of the November portion of the firearms deer season (Nov. 13-14) are required to take their harvested deer (or the head) on the day of harvest to one of MDC’s mandatory CWD sampling stations throughout the Zone.

Hunters must follow carcass-movement restrictions when traveling to a mandatory CWD sampling station. Hunters must present their deer (or the head from their deer) to a mandatory CWD sampling station within the county of harvest, with a few exceptions. Deer that will be delivered to a permitted meat processor or taxidermist within 48 hours or deer heads that will be left at the MDC mandatory CWD sampling station for disposal after sampling may be transported to a sampling station in any county.

Related CWD regulations prohibit the placement of feed or minerals for deer in counties of the CWD Management Zone. For the four counties newly added to the CWD Management Zone, the deer feeding ban will become effective July 1. Additionally, deer transportation regulations effective within all CWD Management Zone counties limit the transportation of some deer parts outside of the county of harvest.

Also related to CWD management, MDC has removed the antler-point restriction (APR) for the upcoming deer season in Camden and Pulaski counties. Younger bucks, which are protected under the APR, are more likely to disperse and potentially spread CWD. Therefore, removing the APR within the CWD Management Zone minimizes the risk of disease spread to other areas.

Also beginning this fall, hunters may fill two Firearms Antlerless Deer Hunting Permits in Camden, Laclede, and Pulaski counties.

Additional information on these and other regulations will be included in MDC’s 2021 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information booklet, available where permits are sold and online starting in July.

CWD is a deadly disease in white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family. The purpose of MDC’s CWD sampling and testing efforts is to find cases as early as possible so the Department can limit the spread of the disease by implementing management actions. The total number of known CWD cases in the state is 206. MDC has tested more than 152,300 deer since the first cases of CWD were found in free-ranging deer in Missouri in 2012. For more information on CWD and MDC efforts to limit the spread of the disease, visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd.

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Sours: https://www.lakenewsonline.com/story/news/environment/2021/05/24/camden-laclede-mcdonald-pulaski-counties-added-chronic-wasting-disease-management-zone/7422145002/
CWD Forum Video

MDC's latest regulation changes add 4 counties to Chronic Wasting Disease Management Zone


There are going to be changes relating to chronic wasting disease surveillance and management efforts.

The Missouri Conservation Commission approved proposed regulation changes from the Department of Conservation during a May 21 open meeting.

These changes will add four counties to the CWD Management Zone while reinstating mandatory CWD sampling requirements, according to a news release from MDC.

The added counties include Camden, Laclede, McDonald and Pulaski. These four were added to the CWD Management Zone due to the disease being found in or near them. The management zone now consists of 34 counties.

Of the 15,300 tested this past year, MDC confirmed there were 44 new cases of the disease. Of those, one was found in Pulaski County, which had no previously known cases. Because of this discovery, Pulaski was added to the CWD Management Zone along with adjacent Camden and Laclede.

More: Collected deer tissue samples show dozens of new chronic wasting disease cases, Missouri Dept. of Conservation says

A CWD-positive deer was also found in northern Benton County in Arkansas within 10 miles of McDonald County in Missouri, so MDC also recommended the county be added to the CWD Management Zone.

The commission also approved reinstating the mandatory CWD sampling for the coming deer season and designated counties must be approved each year. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, MDC waived mandatory sampling requirement for 2020’s opening weekend.

Hunters who harvest deer in CWD Management Zones during opening weekend Nov. 13-14 during the firearms portion of deer season are required to take their harvested deer or the head the day of harvest to one of the sampling stations throughout the zone.

There are carcass-movement restrictions when traveling to a mandatory CWD sampling station. Hunters must present either their deer or the head within the county of harvest. Deer will be delivered to a permitted meat processor or taxidermist within 48 hours or deer heads left for disposal may be transported to a sampling station in any county.

More: Fewer permits sold means lower numbers for harvested turkeys

Placing feed or minerals for deer in counties of CWD Management Zones is prohibited. A ban will be effective July 1 for the latest additions to the zone.

MDC has removed the antler-point restriction, or APR, for the upcoming deer season in Camden and Pulaski counties. 

“Younger bucks, which are protected under the APR, are more likely to disperse and potentially spread CWD,” MDC stated. “Therefore, removing the APR within the CWD Management Zone minimizes the risk of disease spread to other areas.”

Hunters may fill two firearms antlerless deer hunting permits in Camden, Laclede and Pulaski counties.

Sara Karnes is an Outdoors Reporter with the Springfield News-Leader. Follow along with her adventures on Twitter and Instagram @Sara_Karnes. Got a story to tell? Email her at [email protected]

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Sours: https://www.news-leader.com/story/sports/outdoors/2021/05/25/mdcs-regulation-involves-adding-4-counties-cwd-management-zone/7427766002/

Missouri cwd counties

The Missouri Department of Conservation reports it has completed its monitoring, management, and testing efforts for its 2020-2021 chronic wasting disease surveillance year. From those efforts, MDC reports it collected more than 15,300 tissue samples from mostly hunter-harvested deer for CWD testing. MDC has confirmed 44 new cases of CWD from the deer tested.

The new findings bring the total number of CWD cases in the state to 206. MDC has tested more than 152,300 deer since the first cases of CWD were found in free-ranging deer in Missouri in 2012.  Of the 44 new cases, two were found in Putnam County and one in Pulaski County, both of which had no previously known cases of CWD.

The 44 new cases of CWD were found in the following counties: Adair (2), Franklin (5), Jefferson (5), Linn (6), Macon (5), Oregon (3), Polk (1), Pulaski (1), Putnam (2), St Clair (1), Ste Genevieve (12), and Stone (1). One confirmed case came from a deer in Ste. Genevieve County that was found exhibiting signs of CWD infection. The sick deer was observed by several people, and MDC was notified. The sick deer was humanely shot by MDC staff and a tissue sample was submitted for CWD testing. MDC staff properly disposed of the carcass.

It typically takes an average of 18 to 24 months from the time a deer is infected with CWD until it looks visibly sick. Deer can spread CWD long before they look or act sick. In Missouri, most deer that test CWD-positive do not show signs of the disease. Deer showing signs of CWD may present a variety of symptoms, including dramatic weight loss, abnormal behavior, and excessive thirst, drooling, or urination.

MDC Wildlife Health Program Supervisor Jasmine Batten noted that the 15,300 deer tested during the past season decreased significantly from the year before due to the effects of COVID-19 on MDC’s surveillance efforts.

“We tested about 16,000 fewer deer last season compared to the 2019-2020 testing period,” Batten said. “The lower number of deer tested this season was mostly due to MDC suspending our mandatory sampling requirements during the opening weekend due to concerns about human health and safety-related to the COVDID-19 pandemic. Thankfully, the hard work of taxidermists and meat processors who provided samples and the hunters who voluntarily had their deer sampled at a variety of locations allowed us to still adequately monitor and detect CWD throughout the state.”

All deer harvested through the post-deer season CWD management efforts that did not test positive for CWD were either returned to the landowner or donated to local food pantries through the Share the Harvest venison-donation program. More than 80,000 pounds of venison were donated to Share the Harvest from last season’s efforts.

According to MDC, post-deer season targeted culling efforts can help decrease CWD transmission by reducing the number of potentially infected deer within areas where the disease has been detected. Long-term, sustained, targeted culling has been shown to slow the spread of CWD, and MDC is committed to using this management tool to protect the state’s deer herd from the effects of CWD.

CWD is a deadly disease in white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family. The purpose of MDC’s CWD sampling efforts is to find cases as early as possible so the Department can limit the spread of the disease by implementing management actions such as targeted culling. For more information on MDC’s 2020-2021 CWD surveillance results, visit the Missouri Department of Conservation website.

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Facts About EHD \u0026 CWD

Chronic Wasting Disease Regulations

The CWD Management Zone includes counties within approximately 10 miles of CWD detections. Special regulations apply in these counties.

For the 2021–2022 deer seasons, the CWD Management Zone includes Adair, Barry, Camden, Cedar, Chariton, Christian, Clark, Crawford, Franklin, Gasconade, Hickory, Howell, Jefferson, Knox, Laclede, Linn, Macon, McDonald, Mercer, Oregon, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Pulaski, Putnam, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington counties.

Fall 2021 Mandatory CWD Sampling

If you harvest a deer from counties in the CWD Management Zone during Nov. 13 or 14, 2021, you must take your deer — or just the head — on the day of harvest to a CWD sampling station. Hunters are reminded to follow new carcass transport regulations when traveling to CWD sampling stations.

Special Regulations for the CWD Management Zone

2021 CWD map

Carcass Movement Restrictions

  • All deer harvested from CWD Management Zone counties must be Telechecked before any parts are transported out of the county of harvest.
  • Hunters wishing to transport any part of the deer with the spinal column or brain present may only do so if within 48 hours of exiting the county if they deliver the carcass to a meat processor or the head to a taxidermist or an approved MDC CWD sampling site.
  • The following parts may be transported out of CWD Management Zone counties without restriction:
    • Meat that is cut and wrapped or that has been boned out
    • Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached
    • Hides from which all excess tissue has been removed
    • Antlers or antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue
    • Upper canine teeth
    • Finished taxidermy products

Prohibition on feeding

Grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable products used to attract deer are prohibited year-round within CWD Management Zone counties. The following exceptions are allowed:

  • Feed placed within 100 feet of any residence or occupied building
  • Feed placed in a manner that excludes access by deer
  • Feed and minerals used solely for normal agricultural, forest management, or wildlife food plot production practices
  • Feed placed as part of a feral hog or CWD management effort authorized by the Conservation Department

Other Special Regulations for the CWD Management Zone

  • Antler-Point Restriction: MDC has removed the antler-point restriction for CWD-Management-Zone counties. This was done so young bucks are no longer protected from harvest because young bucks can spread the disease to new areas as they search for territories and mates.

Bringing Harvested Deer or Other Cervids into Missouri

  • For deer, elk, moose, or caribou harvested out of state, only the following parts may be brought into Missouri:
    • meat that is cut and wrapped or that has been boned out
    • quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached
    • hides from which all excess tissue has been removed
    • antlers
    • antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue
    • upper canine teeth
    • finished taxidermy products
  • the head with the cape and not more than 6 inches of neck attached may be brought into Missouri only if taken to a licensed taxidermist within 48 hours of entry.

Hunters and Landowners Can Slow the Spread of CWD

Surveillance suggests that CWD is relatively rare in Missouri. There is hope that we can minimize the long-term impacts of the disease if we slow its spread. You can help by:

  • Complying with CWD-related regulations.
  • Properly disposing of deer carcasses in a permitted landfill or by burying carcasses on the property where they were harvested. (Transporting deer carcasses from the property where they were harvested and leaving them lay on the land introduces the greatest risk for disease spread.)
  • Reporting sick deer to your local conservation agent or your regional Conservation Department office.
  • Voluntarily testing deer harvested in the CWD Management Zone outside of opening weekend.
Sours: https://mdc.mo.gov/hunting-trapping/regulations/chronic-wasting-disease-regulations

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