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Updated: Our Mobile Internet Network For Full-Time RVing

Disclosure: None of the companies mentioned below sponsored us. But this post contains Amazon affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. Please read our disclaimer.

Originally published on October 11, 2018

It’s crazy to think that when we first hit the road back in 2015, we only had a 4GB cell data plan (2 of which were bonus GBs and we were sharing the plan with a friend). But since we didn’t have work that required us to be online, we chose to save money and did the best we could with that scant amount of data. The cell data landscape also looked a lot different 3 years ago (it was more complicated to get unlimited plans and large data plans were expensive!).

In reality, it meant we spent a lot of time searching for free Wi-Fi at grocery stores, libraries, coffee shops, friend’s houses - really wherever we could possibly find it. It was stressful. Since we mainly stayed farther out in the woods, we wouldn’t go into town but once a week to restock supplies. Town days were busy on their own, but toss in a week’s worth of online to-dos and it meant we were driving all over town to run errands and then stuck inside a library for hours while the dogs were bored out of their minds waiting for us. We all started to dread town days. 

Over time we slowly increased our data plan, first to 8 GB of paid data with 4 GB of bonus data (September 2016). A year later, Verizon changed their plans and it was a good deal for us to once again increase our data - to 16 GB paid with 4 GB bonus data. And that was the plan we had until May 2018.

Having 20 GB of data was a big game changer. It was a lot of data, especially since we didn’t stream music, movies, or TV shows. We rarely had to go out searching for Wi-Fi after that plan change. But then it happened…we needed internet for work.

So Jerud started data shopping again.

Without going into all the details of what we were looking for and why certain options weren’t going to work, the gist is that we were looking for a plan in addition to our current 20 GB Verizon plan that was just a straight data connection (a mobile hot spot). Jerud contacted all the main carriers and found out that none of their larger sized data plans were viable. I’m keeping the downsides to these data plans short because they’re ever-changing.

VERIZON

Our current phone plan is with Verizon. The next plan up from ours is Verizon’s “unlimited”. It’s not actually unlimited and it was too expensive.

AT&T

Their “unlimited” plan was also expensive and their device options for hot spots were lacking.

T-MOBILE & SPRINT

Neither of the two carriers have adequate coverage. Yes, they’re supposed to merge into one, but that’s not happening for another year – if it actually goes through. We needed a bigger data plan now.

Carriers all make data-only plans less attractive than phone data plans, for example: Verizon’s “unlimited” plan is 22 GB (after 22 GB your data gets deprioritized), while for a data-only plan that “unlimited” is only 15 GB – this is true even if you’re tethering to a phone.

Also, in our opinion, the old school method of purchasing a grandfathered-in, truly unlimited plan from someone else is no longer a viable option. Cell companies are starting to crack down on those plans more and more, and on top of that, the plans have to be handled delicately when it comes to making any changes. If a cell company rep does anything wrong, the whole plan could be cancelled. We just don’t have the energy to pay attention to those kind of details.

Previous Data Plans We Had

In 2018, we signed up with Unlimited To Go for their unlimited AT&T data-only plan. The plan was $100/month at the time. We paid month-to-month and could turn our plan on/off whenever we want – but it involved getting a new SIM card from Unlimited To Go each time.

In 2019, we switched to OTR Mobile because their unlimited AT&T data-only plan was only $60/month. Similar to Unlimited To Go, we could also turn our plan on/off whenever we want, but it meant getting a new SIM card each time and paying $20 for it.

But in May 2020, OTR Mobile stopped offering their AT&T unlimited plan. OTR Mobile plans evidently use TMobile/Sprint now. So, we switched to AT&T’s pre-paid data plan.

AT&T Pre-Paid Data Plan

Since our phones are with Verizon (best coverage), going with AT&T (has the second best coverage for us) meant we’d have more redundancy coverage-wise. It also means that if we go somewhere that doesn’t have Verizon coverage there’s a chance it’ll have AT&T coverage and vice versa (our decision has paid off multiple times since May 2018).

We settled on AT&T’s pre-paid data plan. It’s a new plan that just came out around the beginning of 2021 (we signed up at the end of February). (Update: As of April 26, 2021, we already regret this, see below for why.)

This pre-paid data plan is made exclusively for tablets and mobile hotspot usage, and it doesn’t get throttled or deprioritized – but it’s not unlimited – you get a fixed bucket of data. AT&T offers the plan in four sizes (note, these offerings have already changed):

  • 15GB for $35/month

  • 20GB for $25/month

    • That’s not a typo: It’s really cheaper than the 15GB plan. But, you have to pay for the entire year in advance ($300). AT&T doesn’t give you the option to pay month-to-month. This is the only plan out of the four that requires you to pay for the entire year in advance. This is the plan we’re currently using. We’re not actually sure what happens when the year is up. One rep told made it sound like the plan would switch to month-to-month payments, however, another rep said that if we renewed it would be in another 12-month chunk.

  • 25 GB for $50//month

Looking at their different data plans and their prices, it seems like AT&T is purposely driving people to purchase the 20GB plan – because the math just doesn’t make sense for the other ones. You end up paying more money for less data.

Unlike some data plans I came across, this one doesn’t require you to have an AT&T-specific router to be able to use it. I gave the AT&T salesperson our router’s IMEI to make sure the SIM card and plan would work, but I also brought the actual router to double-check if necessary. The plan ended up costing $300 for the year, $15 activation fee, and taxes.

Despite what a store salesperson tells you, you have to go into an AT&T store to sign up for this plan. It clearly states it on the website. Aside from signing up and getting the SIM card, the salespeople in the store weren’t very helpful. They actually knew less about the plan than I did.

Things we learned after using the 20GB AT&T data plan the first month:

  • The SIM card is assigned its own phone number. The store salesperson didn’t provide me this number, but it was on the receipt. This phone number is needed to create your online AT&T “pay as you go” or paygo account (it’s a different site from AT&T’s regular plans). This site is the only place you can pay, add data, or check your usage.

  • You need to also have a pin number to create a login password for the paygo site, or to make any changes to your account. The store salesperson didn’t tell me about this, and can’t access it  either. This pin can only be received via the SIM. If your router/hotspot has a screen on it, this is easy. You just request the PIN from the paygo site by selecting “forgot password”, then “reset pin” and it shows up on your device. You then have the option of changing it to whatever you like. But if your router doesn’t have a screen (like ours), there are two less-easy options:

    • 1) Put the data SIM card into your phone (or any other device with a screen) temporarily. After the card is in the phone, request the PIN and it will show up on the temporary device. Then you can create your account and put the SIM back into your router.

    • 2) Your router still receives the PIN code even if it doesn’t have a screen – it just can’t display it. So if you’re comfortable with your router’s settings and configurations, you can view the logs and see the SMS message containing your PIN. This is going to be different for every router, so we can’t help you with specifics

  • AT&T’s app for paygo accounts sucks; it just redirects you to the AT&T website. So we deleted it and bookmarked the website instead: www.paygoline.com/websc/home.html.

  • Apparently, the data plan is on a 30-day rotation rather than a monthly one. Meaning our plan didn’t reset on March 26 as we expected since we signed up for it on February 26. Instead, the plan resets every 30 days, which means our data will reset on a different day every other month! This is going to be annoying as heck, but beggars can’t be choosers. Apparently this is normal for prepaid plans, but we’ve never had one before.

  • You can add data whenever you’d like. It costs $10 to add 5GB. That’s the only increment available, but I don’t believe there’s a limit to how many times you can add to your plan each month. 

We quickly discovered how much we missed our previous unlimited plan because we went through our 20GB of VZ cell data and the 20GB AT&T data before the month was up. So, we ended up signing up for a second 20GB data plan. Our router can be configured to “fail over” from one SIM to the other, letting us effectively combine the two pools of data seamlessly. Combined with the first AT&T plan and the data on our Verizon plan, that gives us 60 GB of data/month, which seems to be enough (so far). We’re still looking for ways to reduce our consumption.

Why we regret getting the AT&T 12-month prepaid plan

What they DON’T tell you is that once you prepay, your money is gone. No refunds, credits, or reimbursements. This is probably due to the AT&T retail store staff not really knowing or caring about the prepaid plans, which seem to be almost a whole separate business entity from the postpaid products. If you change plans, you forfeit what you’ve already paid, which sucks if you’ve prepaid for a month, but REALLY sucks if you prepaid for a year. Folks used to prepaid cell services are likely not surprised by this — but this was our first time using a non-postpaid plan, and the general runaround we got from AT&T throughout the process led us right into this trap. There is plenty of confusion, miscommunication, and sloppiness any time you deal with AT&T and in this case we got screwed because not even 2 months after making the $300/year plan available, AT&T now has 100GB for $55/month, and you don’t even have to prepay for a year. We can’t switch to that plan though, because we’d be throwing away the money from the 20GB plan since AT&T won’t give us a credit for it.

We only found out about the 100GB plan thanks to Josh’s comment below. The other messed up thing about AT&T is that they had advertised the plan as $50/month, but when we called AT&T they said it’s actually $55 and wouldn’t honor the price on the website.

Normally prepaying for services gets you a better deal, but this is one place where it is NOT the right move. Maybe other providers are different, but AT&T’s offerings are too volatile to risk locking yourself in to 12 months. We strongly suggest steering well clear of any 12-month prepay for AT&T services. We certainly wish we had.

If you’re interested in buying one of our 20GB plans, just shoot us an email, we’ll sell it to you at a prorated price and change the account information over you.

Why We Chose Cellular Router Over Hot Spot

To keep this section short and simple, the main reason we got a cellular router over a hot spot was that it offered the best reception at the best price. A cellular router offered better signal than a hot spot, without having to purchase any additional accessories - and at a cost $100 more. On top of that, cellular routers are made to be left on; hot spots tend to overheat and fail when used 24/7.

  

MOFI4500 ROUTER

The cellular router we chose to purchase from Unlimited To Go was the MOFI4500 Router. Here are the three main reasons why we chose MOFI:

MOFI4500 comes with four antennas, but we upgraded to get two paddle antennas (they’re stronger than regular antennas).
  • MOFI was offered by Unlimited To Go which means we wouldn’t have to pay the one-time $20 BYO device surcharge.

  • MOFI is easy to power off 12V. Even though it doesn’t come with a cigarette lighter charger, it’s easy to find one that will work with it.

  • MOFI has two antenna ports for MIMO (this is a type of antenna configuration used with LTE technology to help pick up weak signal).

We got MOFI in May and used it until the end of September – when the SIM card slot broke and could no longer hold the card in place. We got the warranty replacement but decided to sell the new replacement MOFI.

This incident spurred Jerud to get back on the web to research alternative cell routers. We decided to totally replace MOFI after only 4 months because:

The antenna ports for the coax cables are on the top left and right.
  • The MOFI had to be rebooted frequently to find new towers and make new connections.

  • SIM card broke slot broke after only 4 months, which it really shouldn’t have (we don’t ever remove the card).

  • The angle of the antenna ports on MOFI meant that the two coax cables from the antenna connect from opposite directions. This made it difficult to prevent the cables from kinking. It also made it harder to figure out where to place the router in the rig.

  • The router’s admin interface was difficult to use.

  • There isn’t a manual on how to use the software when you log into the router.

Cradlepoint IBR600B ROUTER

We replaced the MOFI with Cradlepoint and been using that since. There were a few different Cradlepoint models to choose from, but we decided to get the IBR600B router because:

This Cradlepoint router is actually smaller than the MOFI router. We placed the red and blue tape to remind us where the coax cables need to go. The Cradlepoint also comes with paddle antennas.
  • It has two SIM slots. While we only have one SIM card, this router is able to use two SIM cards if we ever decide to get an additional one.

  • The Cradlepoint IBR600B has the “fail over” ability, which the MOFI didn’t. “Fail over” means that if the data on one SIM card is used up or that card’s cell carrier has bad signal, the router will seamlessly use the other SIM card to connect.

  • This router also allows users to switch between two SIM cards (and other sources of internet such as Wi-Fi and LAN) on the fly without having to make any physical hardware changes.

  • This model has only one cell modem which helps keep it in our price point. Having more than one modem is overkill for our application.

  • Cradlepoint cell routers are considered an “enterprise-grade solution”; they’re designed for businesses and are a tougher piece of electronics than the MOFI. Cradlepoint routers are meant to be installed in vehicles and used heavily. We realized after purchasing MOFI that we like to bring it with us in the truck when we’re scouting boondock sites to see whether either Verizon signal (from our cell phones) or AT&T signal (from our cell router) are available, so having a robust device is important due to all that handling. Technically, the MOFI4500 router is also considered “enterprise-grade”, but didn’t seem to be as durable as Cradlepoint.

  • The orientation of the antenna ports are on the same side of the router, making it a lot more convenient to use with an antenna.

  • The admin interface is better than MOFI. It provides users more information and more control over how it works.

  • There is an available 12V vehicle adapter that we purchased separately for $22.49.

The only downside is that it isn’t offered through Unlimited To Go. So, if that’s what we had gotten first, we would’ve had to pay the BYO device surcharge. And the Cradlepoint is ~$100 more expensive than MOFI.

Update: As of January 2020 we learned there is another downside to choosing Cradlepoint. When we bought the router, it came with a (required) 1-year service plan. While the customer/technical support this plan provided was truly exceptional, we decided to not renew it, since our setup is quite simple and requires little support now that it’s running. However, we recently learned that Cradlepoint is moving towards a mandatory-subscription model with all new firmware versions, and probably by the end of the year there will be no ‘current’ firmware that does not require being paired with a service plan. So we’re basically locked-in to the version of firmware we have now, unless we re-subscribe. While the plan is not very expensive — and is definitely worth its price — this does make the Cradlepoint somewhat less attractive for tight budgets.

 

Proxicast 4G/LTE (MIMO) PANEL Antenna

The plan wasn’t to get an antenna right away. We were going to use the cell router for awhile and wait before spending the additional money for one. But when we arrived in Crested Butte, we found a really sweet secluded boondocking site that barely got any cell signal. We were going to be around for a couple of weeks, so we decided to bite the bullet.  

We chose the Proxicast 4G/LTE (MIMO) panel antenna for these reasons:

  • Wanted a MIMO antenna because it’s especially useful for being able to get a weak LTE signal.

  • Wanted a directional antenna because even though it takes more time to aim, you can pull signals from farther away than an omnidirectional antenna. Since once we’re boondocked, we stay for at least a week, it’s worth spending the time to aim it.

  • Yagi is another style of directional antenna that we could’ve gotten, but to be able to use it for a MIMO connection meant getting two individual Yagis (because each Yagi is only one antenna). This would’ve made the whole setup bulkier and pricier. But it probably would’ve been more powerful. The Proxicast comes with both antennas built into one box.

This is where the Proxicast gets attached to our rig.

We purchased and started using the Proxicast antenna at the end of June and so far we don’t have any complaints about it. It works great and we’ve definitely been able to stay at a handful of sites because it got cell signal that our cell router wasn’t able to.

The antenna is designed to be clamped onto a pole. Most people install antennas to sit permanently on the roof of their rig. We didn’t – initially because we didn’t know where would be a good spot on the roof to install it and we wanted to use it for awhile first. But almost 1.5 years later, we still don’t have it permanently installed and don’t see the need to because we don’t always need to use it.

Jerud salvaged the pole from an old pool cleaning net a while back. The antenna is attached to the pool pole and using hose clamps he attached suction cups to the pole. The antenna sits 15 feet above the Toaster by suctioning the pole to the side of our slide. The slide is the best spot for us to attach the pole/antenna setup because it doesn’t create any shadows on our solar panels. The coax cable is routed underneath our rig to the cell router sits inside a cabinet.

The antenna is waterproof, so it can remain outside in all weather conditions. But the suction cups came off the slide once, causing the whole thing to fall on the ground and crack the antenna housing. We weren’t able to buy a replacement part to fix it, so caulking it was the solution to make it waterproof again. Now when we use the antenna we tie the pool pole to the solar panel rail with a ski strap to keep it from falling off.

Our Cradlepoint sits inside this cabinet and has a on/off switch. But it’s always on which means we can actually use it on travel days while we’re towing the rig.
Sometimes, if we really want to stay at a boondock site that doesn’t have any cell signal, we’ll bring the Proxicast antenna with us just in case that helps the signal situation.
Product Review CCrane DSC_1103.jpg
What's Up With Mobile Hotspots jetpack flying.jpg
Life On The RoadChingInternet, Cellular Data, Cell Data, Verizon, AT&T, Wi-Fi, Unlimited To Go, Unlimited Data, Cell Router, MOFI4500 Router, Cradlepoint IBR600B Router, Proxicast Antenna, Data Only Plan, ATT, Hotspot, WiFi
Sours: https://www.livesmallridefree.com/blog/our-mobile-internet-network-for-full-time-rving

MoFi issue or Verizon police?

Postby 431cruiser » Mon Jul 05, 2021 5:46 pm

Hi guys. Thanks for letting us come here for help.

I bought a MoFi 4500-4GXeLTE-Sim7 in early February and a new SIM card on an unlimited data plan for a phone I had. It has worked great until recently, and I can’t tell if the router is failing or if Verizon has stopped me since I don’t know the symptoms of either.

I disabled the WiFi on the MoFi in February when I installed it and added a D-Link router. Our phones, tablets and laptops connect to it wirelessly. My desktop is wired to it. It has worked great.

Early signs, maybe….

Two weeks ago, my girlfriend’s iPhone 12 began having sporadic problems connecting to wireless at my house. My iPhone 12 Mini was working fine as were my desktop, laptop and her laptop. So it seemed like the problem was with her phone, but she claimed it worked fine at her house and workplace.

Then, one day last week it wasn’t working consistently at these places and, not one with patience, she bought a new phone thinking it was in fact her phone.

The new phone had issues at my house just like the old one. I thought her original phone had a corrupted file that was transferred over by the Verizon store when they loaded the new one. My phone, desktop, laptops, etc were still working well. I updated the firmware and did a speed test. I was about 10 mbps slower than in February, but without the test, it wasn’t noticeable.

Yesterday, I decided to unplug the router and restart it to see if that would help with her phone since the router hadn’t been turned off since February. When it rebooted, my desktop would no longer work, nor the phones, laptops, etc. I eliminated the D-Link to rule it out, reset the MoFi router a few times and created a fresh network, but still not connected.

The internet light on the router is on and blinks intermittently, but it may have always done that- I can’t remember. The connection test link on the MoFi page says no internet. I can’t ping a website.

After resetting a few times, I finally decided to try the SIM card from my personal cellphone. The desktop is connected directly into the MoFi for troubleshooting. A browser which was already opened on my desktop loaded immediately and the internet was working well. Until about 5 minutes later when the connection was interrupted and now I’m back to where I was yesterday after unplugging the router for the first time.

I went to the Verizon account for that SIM card and accidentally clicked on a “buy data” or something similar link and the site stated something like, “You have unlimited data and do not need this add-on.”

I checked the data usage the first couple of months and it seemed like it always stated zero or “unlimited”. Now, it shows what I’ve used. I work from home and use a lot of data.

The router had the most recent firmware loaded a few days ago. The D-Link isn’t the culprit. I don’t know what else to try in terms of troubleshooting other than getting a new SIM card and cellphone account.

Is the above how it looks when Verizon or other companies boot us? If so, there’s probably no point in getting a card from them, right?

I’ve typed this from my cellphone and need internet for work, so I appreciate any help, tips, guidance you can provide.

Sours: https://ltehacks.com/viewtopic.php?t=2817
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@dlward wrote:

Greetings Group my first post/question...I'm wanting to buy the MoFi 4500 router and cannot find any information if this router can be used with Verizon 4G service. I've tried contacting tech support to see if this is an authorized Verizon router if so can I buy a Verizon SIM card/unlimited data plan to use with it.
I'm in a rural area and currently using the MiFi 6620L JetPack 15GB 4G unlimited plan.
I'm wanting to upgrade to the MoFi 4500 router so I can add Yagi outdoor antennas to increase signal strength/speed plus that router has USB/Ethernet ports to tether computer/printers/hard drives.
Thanks for any advice/thoughts/info. Dave


On the MOFI Network web site, there are three 4500 model routers that say 'fully certified with Verizon'.

http://mofinetwork.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=1&keyword=ve...

...Just another VZW customer...trying to offer some assistance...

Sours: https://community.verizon.com/t5/Additional-Products-General/MoFi-4500-Router/td-p/1164899
Why I can't recommend MOFI anymore

RV Internet with the MoFi 4500

We’re making another upgrade to our RV workspace; this time it’s adding RV Internet with the MoFi 4500. Most who travel in an RV can easily work and have time left over to see the sites. There are a few necessities for the RV workspace – comfortable work area, a computer, and Internet. Internet can be the biggie when traveling and depending on the type of work to be performed, service and speeds can differ widely. Some who work from the RV can get by with slower Internet, only needing to send emails with the occasional attached document. Others, such as our needs, require very reliable, high speed internet. As a result, we are upgrading from an Internet hotspot to a feature rich, business class cellular/Wi-Fi router.

Our RV Internet Requirements.

Aside from the video work driven by our iLoveRVlife YouTube channel, we have client work that requires transmitting very large video, graphic and document files over Internet. As the adage goes: “Time is money.” but, when it comes to RV travel, time can also relate to fun time. I may work a day then play a day or work in the morning then Joan and I see the sites in the afternoon. Maintaining a productive work schedule and pleasure travel does not allow us to have slow Internet. This isn’t a luxury and the cost in time increases with slow Internet causing extra hours to upload and download large files.

For the past several years we have used a variety of data cell plans and have settle with AT&T and Verizon. In most locations, Verizon has provided the better coverage of the two. We have successfully used a MiFi 6600L Verizon hotspot, but with limitations. The hotspot doesn’t support an external antenna and the Wi-Fi coverage in the 5th wheel is limited to a few feet. We also have devices that we want to connect via an Ethernet cable and this connectivity doesn’t exist with a hotspot.

Using the MoFi 4500 3G/4g/LTE Router.

RV Internet with the MoFi 4500 router is a game changer. This feature rich router supports a wide variety of cellular bands including our needs for Verizon and AT&T. While I’m not sharing the entire list of features for the MoFi 4500, these are some that were important for our needs:

  • Both Wi-Fi and hardwire Ethernet connectivity
  • Auto and bandlock option for areas that may have congested cellular traffic
  • Extend range antennas for both Wi-Fi and cellular
  • The ability to add an option external antenna when located in fringe cell coverage areas
  • Support for VPS services
  • NAT for basic firewall support

This is but a fraction of the features offered by the MoFi 4500, but those we found important for our Internet business and entertainment needs.

Setting up the MoFi 4500 couldn’t be easier. Using the router straight out of the box took a few minutes inset a SIM card, attach the Wi-Fi and cell antennas and attach power to the unit. (Note: Make sure the correct antennas are attached to the correct terminals in the router. Failure to do so will result in poor service and possible damage to the router and/or antennas.) If no advanced features are needed, power the router, wait 4 to 5 minutes to sync with the cell service and you’re online.

A basic configuration is suggested. At a minimum, change the root password for the router and access for Wi-Fi. If nothing else is needed, that’s it.

Testing the MoFi 4500.

For this test, our RV is located in an area that has poor cell coverage. In the video below we compare both the cell strength of our hotspot to the MoFi 4500 using a desktop set up with not external antennas. We also show a speed test for both units. The improvements in speeds were better than expected with a 226% increase in download speed and 126% increase in upload.

What’s Next for Our MoFi 4500?

Our next step will be to add a portable, external antenna to our MoFi 4500 configuration. We have an antenna ordered and will be showing how we plan to use in a mobile fashion as well as Internet performance improvements.

Is a MoFi 4500 Right For You?

If your RV cell based Internet needs are basic with simple, low bandwidth requirements such as the email, small sized document correspondence and the occasional use of social media and YouTube video, then a good quality hotspot may work best. A hotspot is as simple as turn on and use.

But a hotspot has its limits. When higher bandwidth is needed for fringe areas, ability to connect computing devices via a hardwire Ethernet cable, and extended Wi-Fi distance not to mention the wide range of enterprise business class feature, then the MoFi 4500 may be more suited for your needs.

Sours: https://www.ilovervlife.com/rv-internet-with-the-mofi-4500/

Verizon mofi

4.0 out of 5 starsGood product, Great support

Reviewed in the United States on June 12, 2017

Verified Purchase

Update 26 Feb 18 - Well, after a week or 10 days of driving them nuts, with the help of MOFI tech support, I was finally able to determine that my DNS issue was NOT the fault of the router, but my VPN service provider. Many thanks to them for their patience. Now if my VPN provider was only so attentive. I'll add back the star I dropped earlier, out of pure embarrassment.
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Update 05 Feb 18 - Well the router lasted about 8 months, and then it lost it's mind. Initially, it locked up and I could not get any traffic through it on either the WAN or the LAN side of things. I had to power cycle it a bunch of times before I guess I got lucky and it came back online. Still, it wasn't right. The wireless side of the LAN seemed to work OK, but anything on the wired switch had no connection, Thinking it had something seriously hosed, I did a reset to the factory defaults and reconfigured my network.

That worked - kinda. I had connectivity but there were lots of weird things happening. The biggest issue was that the DNS server in the router started acting flaky. Webpages were taking forever to come up, and the Windows logs were showing lots of instances where it was timing out or not even able to resolve the URL servers names. Pinging the sites from the WAN side of the router always worked immediately. There were also a drastic increase in disconnects requiring a reboot or power cycling, from maybe once a month to once every 24-48 hours. I was getting some real weird name in Windows assigned to the networks as well. The wired LAN would get the SSID, and both LANs sometimes saw the network name assigned to the DNS prefix. Very weird stuff.

I spent 3 weeks monkeying around with this, when the router locked up again. Another power cycle later, and now I couldn't get to the log in page for the configuration screens. I get an error message that makes it look like the internal webserver is out to lunch. But the router itself still is maintaining internet connectivity. But if anything else happens I am surely screwed.

I contacted MOFI via their trouble ticket system and opened 2 tickets, one for the bad web server and one for the general weirdness coming from the router. There was an initial response asking a lot of the basic questions and could I send them the log files from the router. DUH! Level One service. I CAN'T get into the router you doofus. How can I send you a log file?

So I very carefully documented everything I could, including screen shots of the Windows System Log to support the DNS problems. Well that stuff has been sitting there for a week now and NO RESPONSE. I finally got tired of waiting on them and asked for an RMA as the router is still under warranty. It will be interesting to see what the response to that will be. I will update at that time. Until then I will knock a star off for the shabby support I got this time.
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If the first router had worked correctly out of the box this would easily have gotten 5 stars from me. Even so, I wish I could give it 4 1/2, considering the great product support I got from the people at MOFI.

Got my MOFI router, and had problems getting it to connect to the tower, so I put in a trouble ticket Friday afternoon. I was amazed to find I got a response Saturday morning. Tech support worked with me via e-mail through the day, and we still couldn't get it to work with my T-Mobile SIM although it worked fine with a Verizon SIM. Called them Monday morning and talked to Ravin. I am an IT professional and it was so refreshing to get to talk with another professional that was not condescending, played well in the sandbox, and was technically astute concerning his product and Cellular Networking in general.

We spent the better part of Monday going through everything with the router and it definitely seemed like a configuration issue with the T-Mobile SIM as my Verizon SIM was connecting immediately to that network at respectable LTE speeds.To make what's already been a long story shorter, it turned out there was some very weird and obscure hardware fault of the router itself. Two days later I lost all communications with the router..I notified MOFI on my still open trouble ticket, and got a near immediate response. They were going to overnight me a brand new router from Canada to South Carolina.

The new modem worked perfectly right out of the box with the original T-Mobile SIM and with amazing reception and throughput. I live in the sticks, over 2 miles from the tower, and I was pulling over 30Mps Down and 5 Mps up when there was very light cell traffic. Even during busy afternoon hours I get 16-20 Down and 3-4 Up. I couldn't pull that even with the Verizon SIM. Connecting to T-Mobile's Band 12 700Ghz signal and getting band aggregation during low usage hours makes an astounding difference.

Pairing this router with my unlimited data plan from T-Mobile has truly been an economic lifesaver for me. $80 a month and I have been using 60-90G a month with no throttling and full resolution streaming even for 4K UHD video. Thanks MOFI! Your product and your service has exceeded all my expectations!

Update 4 Aug 17: Still going strong, and while I am a little too far away to get it to work all that often, the Carrier Aggregation function on this router DOES work and I am attaching a screen capture of one of my Speedtest sessions. 80+mps on a cellular connection through a VPN is mind boggling. Even when the local tower is busy during the day, I regularly get 16-20mps on Band 12 without aggregation, as long as the atmospheric conditions are OK. I notice that breezy weather can seriously affect the throughput, but even on really breezy days I see 8-10mps. This is with a signal that runs -98 to -115dBs

Customer image

4.0 out of 5 stars Good product, Great support
By joemaamah on June 12, 2017

Update 26 Feb 18 - Well, after a week or 10 days of driving them nuts, with the help of MOFI tech support, I was finally able to determine that my DNS issue was NOT the fault of the router, but my VPN service provider. Many thanks to them for their patience. Now if my VPN provider was only so attentive. I'll add back the star I dropped earlier, out of pure embarrassment.
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Update 05 Feb 18 - Well the router lasted about 8 months, and then it lost it's mind. Initially, it locked up and I could not get any traffic through it on either the WAN or the LAN side of things. I had to power cycle it a bunch of times before I guess I got lucky and it came back online. Still, it wasn't right. The wireless side of the LAN seemed to work OK, but anything on the wired switch had no connection, Thinking it had something seriously hosed, I did a reset to the factory defaults and reconfigured my network.

That worked - kinda. I had connectivity but there were lots of weird things happening. The biggest issue was that the DNS server in the router started acting flaky. Webpages were taking forever to come up, and the Windows logs were showing lots of instances where it was timing out or not even able to resolve the URL servers names. Pinging the sites from the WAN side of the router always worked immediately. There were also a drastic increase in disconnects requiring a reboot or power cycling, from maybe once a month to once every 24-48 hours. I was getting some real weird name in Windows assigned to the networks as well. The wired LAN would get the SSID, and both LANs sometimes saw the network name assigned to the DNS prefix. Very weird stuff.

I spent 3 weeks monkeying around with this, when the router locked up again. Another power cycle later, and now I couldn't get to the log in page for the configuration screens. I get an error message that makes it look like the internal webserver is out to lunch. But the router itself still is maintaining internet connectivity. But if anything else happens I am surely screwed.

I contacted MOFI via their trouble ticket system and opened 2 tickets, one for the bad web server and one for the general weirdness coming from the router. There was an initial response asking a lot of the basic questions and could I send them the log files from the router. DUH! Level One service. I CAN'T get into the router you doofus. How can I send you a log file?

So I very carefully documented everything I could, including screen shots of the Windows System Log to support the DNS problems. Well that stuff has been sitting there for a week now and NO RESPONSE. I finally got tired of waiting on them and asked for an RMA as the router is still under warranty. It will be interesting to see what the response to that will be. I will update at that time. Until then I will knock a star off for the shabby support I got this time.
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If the first router had worked correctly out of the box this would easily have gotten 5 stars from me. Even so, I wish I could give it 4 1/2, considering the great product support I got from the people at MOFI.

Got my MOFI router, and had problems getting it to connect to the tower, so I put in a trouble ticket Friday afternoon. I was amazed to find I got a response Saturday morning. Tech support worked with me via e-mail through the day, and we still couldn't get it to work with my T-Mobile SIM although it worked fine with a Verizon SIM. Called them Monday morning and talked to Ravin. I am an IT professional and it was so refreshing to get to talk with another professional that was not condescending, played well in the sandbox, and was technically astute concerning his product and Cellular Networking in general.

We spent the better part of Monday going through everything with the router and it definitely seemed like a configuration issue with the T-Mobile SIM as my Verizon SIM was connecting immediately to that network at respectable LTE speeds.To make what's already been a long story shorter, it turned out there was some very weird and obscure hardware fault of the router itself. Two days later I lost all communications with the router..I notified MOFI on my still open trouble ticket, and got a near immediate response. They were going to overnight me a brand new router from Canada to South Carolina.

The new modem worked perfectly right out of the box with the original T-Mobile SIM and with amazing reception and throughput. I live in the sticks, over 2 miles from the tower, and I was pulling over 30Mps Down and 5 Mps up when there was very light cell traffic. Even during busy afternoon hours I get 16-20 Down and 3-4 Up. I couldn't pull that even with the Verizon SIM. Connecting to T-Mobile's Band 12 700Ghz signal and getting band aggregation during low usage hours makes an astounding difference.

Pairing this router with my unlimited data plan from T-Mobile has truly been an economic lifesaver for me. $80 a month and I have been using 60-90G a month with no throttling and full resolution streaming even for 4K UHD video. Thanks MOFI! Your product and your service has exceeded all my expectations!

Update 4 Aug 17: Still going strong, and while I am a little too far away to get it to work all that often, the Carrier Aggregation function on this router DOES work and I am attaching a screen capture of one of my Speedtest sessions. 80+mps on a cellular connection through a VPN is mind boggling. Even when the local tower is busy during the day, I regularly get 16-20mps on Band 12 without aggregation, as long as the atmospheric conditions are OK. I notice that breezy weather can seriously affect the throughput, but even on really breezy days I see 8-10mps. This is with a signal that runs -98 to -115dBs
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Customer image
Customer image
Sours: https://www.amazon.com/MOFI4500-4GXeLTE-SIM4-Router-T-Mobile-Verizon-Embedded/product-reviews/B01EY11K40?reviewerType=all_reviews
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